A Text Book of Theory of Machines

A Text Book of Theory of Machines
اسم المؤلف
Dr. J.s. Brar, Dr. R.k. Bansal
التاريخ
30 ديسمبر 2023
المشاهدات
219
التقييم
(لا توجد تقييمات)
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A Text Book of Theory of Machines
(In S.I. Units)
[For Degree, U.P.S.C. (Engg. Services), A.M.I.E. (India)]
Dr. J.S. BRAR
B.E., M.E., Ph.D. ([IT, Delhi)
Head Department of Mechanical Engineering
Delhi College of Engineering, Delhi.
By
Dr. R.K. BANSAL
B.Sc. Engg. (Mech.), M. Tech., Hons. (I.I.T., Delhi)
Ph.D., M.I.E. (India)
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Delhi College of Engineering, Delhi
Chapters
�duction
1.1. Definition
1.2. Mechanism and Machine
1.3. Link
1.4. Kinematic Pair
1.5. Degrees ofFreedom
1.6. Kinematic Chain
Solved Problems 1.1-1.5
Contents
1.7. Binary, Ternary, Quaternary Joints
1.8. Binary, Ternary and Quaternary Links
1.9. Degrees ofFreedom for Plane Mechanism
1.10. Inversion ofMechanism
1.11. Different Types ofKinematic Chains and Their Inversions
1.11.1. Four Bar Chains
1.11.2. Single-Slider Crank MechanisIJ?,
1.11.3. Double-Slider Crank Chain
Solved Problems 1.6-1.15
Highlights
Exercise–1
on ofInertia
2.1. Introduction
2.2. Displacement
2.3. Velocity
2.4. Acceleration
2.5. Acceleration ofa Particle Moving along a Circular Path
2.6. Angular Displacement
2.7. Angular Velocity
2.8. Angular Acceleration
2.9. Force, Mass and Weight
2.10. Centripetal and Centrifugal Force
2.11. Mass Moment oflnertia
2.12. Angular Momentum
2.13. Torque
2.14. Work
2.15. Power
2.16. Energy
2.16.1. Potential Energy
2.16.2. Strain Energy
2.16.3. Kinetic Energy
Solved Problems 2.1-2.16
2.17. Law ofConservation ofEnergy
2.18. Impulse and Impulsive Force
2.19. Law ofConservation ofMomentum
2.20. Impact ofTwo Bodies
Pages
Chapters
2.20.1. Co-efficient ofRestitution
Solved Problems 2.17-2.20
(x)
2.20.2. Loss ofKinetic Energy during Impact
Solved Problems 2.21-2.25
2.21. Simple Harmonic Motion
2.21.1. Definitions ofsome terms used with S.H.M.
Solved Problems 2.26-2.28
2.21.2. Oscillation ofthe bodies having S.H.M.
Solved Problems 2.29-2.30
2.21.3. OsciHation ofa Simple Pendulum
Solved Problems 2.31-2.35
Highlights
Exercise-2
ity of Points in Mechanism
3.1. Introduction
(A) INSTANTANEOUS CENTRE METHOD
3.2. Instantaneous Centre Method
Solved Problem 3.1
3.3. Analysis ofReciprocating Engine Mechanism
by Instantaneous Centre Method
Solved Problems 3.2-3.3
3.4. Analysis ofFour Bar Mechanism by Instantaneous Centre Method
Solved Problems 3.4-3.5
3.5. Number and Types oflnstantaneous Centres in a Mechanism
3.6. Method for Locating an Instantaneous Centre
3.7. Kennedy Theorem (or Three Centres-in-line Theorem)
3.8. Procedure of Locating Instantaneous Centres
Solved Problems 3.6-3.7
(B) RELATIVE VELOCITY METHOD
3.9. Relative Velocity Method
3.9.1. Relative Velocity oftwo bodies moving in straight lines
3.9.2. Relative Velocity ofa rigid link
3.10. Velocities in Four Bar Chain
3.11. Velocities in Slider Crank Mechanism
Solved Problems 3.8-3.9
3.12. Rubbing Velocity at a Pin-Joint
Solved Problems 3.10-3.15
3.13. Forces Acting in a Mechanism
3.14. Mechanical Advantage
/ Solved Highlights Problems 3.16-3.17
,./Acceleration in Mechanism
J ·4.1. Introduction
4.2. Acceleration ofa Body Moving along a Circular Path
4.3. Acceleration Diagram for a Link
4.4. Acceleration Diagram for a Slider Crank Mechanism
Solved Problems 4.1-4.5
4.5. Coriolis Acceleration Component
Solved Problems 4.6-4.11
Pages
143
148(xi)
Chapters
Highlights
/ Exercise-4
� Mechanism with Lower Pairs
5.1. Introduction
5.2. Pantograph
5.3. Straight Line Mechanism
5.4. Exact Straight Line Motion Mechanisms
Solved Problem 5.1
Approximate Straight Line Motion Mechanism
5.5.1. Watt’s Straight Line Mechanism
5.5.2. Modified Scott-Russel Mechanism
5.5.3. Gross-Hopper Mechanism
5.5.4. Tehebichetrs Mechanism
5.5.5. Robert’s Mechanism
Solved Problems 5.2-5.3
Application ofStraight Line Motion in Engine Indicators
5.6.1. Simplex Indicator
Solved Problems 5.4
5.6.2. Crosby Indicator
5.6.3. Thomson Indicator
5.6.4. Double Mclnnes Indicator
Steering Gears
5.7.1. Davis Steering Gear
Solved Problem 5.5
5.7.2. Ackermann Steering Gear
Universal or Hooke’s Joint
5.8.1. Analysis of Hooke’s Joint
5.8.2. Ratio ofAngular Velocities ofthe shafts
5.8.3. Conditions for equal speeds ofdriven and ring shafts
5.8.4. Maximum and Minimum speeds ofdriven shaft
Solved Problems 5.6-5.10
Double Hooke’s Joint
Solved Problem 5.11
Highlights
Exercise-5
�ction
6.1. Introduction
6.2. Definitions
6.2.1. Co-efficient offriction
6.2.2. Angle offriction
6.2.3. Cone of friction
6.3. Types of Friction
6.3.1. Dry friction
6.3.2. Greasy friction
6.3.3. Film friction
6.4. Law:s of Dry Friction
Solved Problems 6.1-6.6
Pages
213(xii)
Angle of Repose
Chapters
6.5.
6.6. Equilibrium ofa Body lying on a Rough Inclined Plane
Solved Problems 6.7-6.11
6.7.
6.8.
6.9.
Screw Threads Friction
Screw-Jack
Solved Problems 6.12-6.17
V-Threads Friction
Solved Problem 6.18
Pivot and Collar Bearing
6.10.1. Flat pivot
Solved Problem 6.19
6.10.2. Conical pivot
6.10.3. Truncated conical pivot
Solved Problems 6.20-6.21
L6.10.4. Friction Clutches Solved Flat collar Problems 6.22-6.23
6.11.1. Disc clutch or single plate clutch
Solved Problems 6.24-6.30
6.11.2. Multi plate clutch
Solved Problems 6.31-6.33
6.11.3. Cone clutch
‘ Solved Problems 6.34-6.35
6.12. Greasy Friction
6.12.1. Greasy friction ofa journal
6.12.2. Greasy friction ofa slider-crank mechanism
6.13. Film Friction or Viscous Friction
Highlights
Exercise-6

  1. .n’e1ts, Ropes and Chain Drives
    V7.1. Introduction
    7.2. Open Flat Belt Drive
    7.2.1. Velocity Ratio of Open Belt Drive
    Solved Problems 7.1-7.2
    7.2.2. Slip of the Belt
    7.2.3. Creep ofthe Belt
    Solved Problems 7.3-7.5
    7.3. Cross Belt Drive
    7.4. Compound Belt Drive
    Solved Problem 7.6
    7.5. Length of Belt
    7.5.1. Length ofan Open Belt Drive
    7.5.2. Length ofa Cross-Belt Drive
    Solved Problems 7.7-7.8
    7.6. Ratio of Belt Tensions
    7.7. Power Transmitted by Belt
    Solved Problems 7.9-7.10
    Pages
    304(xiii)
    Centrifugal Tension
    Chapters
    7.8.
    7.9. Maximum Power Transmitted by a B�lt
    Solved Problems 7.11-7.14
    7.10. Initial Tension in the Belt
    Solved Problems 7.15-7.17
    7.11. V-Belt Drive and Rope-Drive
    Solved Problems 7.18-7.23
    7.12. Chain Drive
    7.13. Relative Advantages and Disadvantages ofChain and Belt
    (or Rope) Drives
    Highlights
    Exercise-7
  2. �es and Dynamometers
    ../”‘”8.1. Introduction 8.2. Types ofBrakes 8.2.1. Simple Block or Shoe Brake Solved Problems 8.1-8.5 8.2.2. Band Brake Solved Problems 8.6-8.11 8.2.3. Band and Block Brake Solved Problems 8.12-8.13 8.2.4. Internal Expanding Shoe Brake Solved Problem 8.14 8.3. The Braking ofa Vehicle Solved Problems 8.15-8.16 8.4. Dynamometer 8.5. Absorption Dynamometer 8.5.1. Prony_Brake Dynanometer 8.5.2. Rope Brake Dynamometer Solved Problem 8.17 8.6. Transmission Dynamometer 8.6.1. Epi-cyclic Train Dynamometer 8.6.2. Belt Transmission Dynamometer Solved Problem 8.18 8.6.3. Torsion Dynamometer Highlights / Exercise-8 !)/Gears 9.1. Introduction 9.2. Classification ofGears 9.3. Definition ofthe terms used in Gears Solved Problems 9.1-9.2 9.4. Law ofGearing or Condition for Constant Velocity Ratio ofGear Wheels. 9.5. Velocity ofSliding 9.6. Forms ofTeeth 9.7. Cycloidal Profile Teeth 9.7.1. Formation ofa Cycloid Rack Tooth Profile 405Chapters (xiv) 9.7.2. Formation ofa Cycloid Teeth ofaGear 9.7.3. Involute Profile Teeth 9.7.4. InvoluteGear Teeth 9.7.5. Important Points for Involute Profile ToothedGears in Mesh 9.7.6. System ofGear Teeth 9.8. Length ofPath ofContact 9.9. Length ofArc ofContact 9.10. Number ofPairs ofTeeth in Contact (or Contact ratio) Solved Problems 9.3-9.5 9.11. Interference in InvoluteGears Solved Problems 9.6-9..8 9.12. The Minimum Number ofTeeth required on the Pinion in Order to Avoid Interference 9.13. The Minimum Number ofTeeth required on the Wheel in order to avoid Interference Solved Problems 9.9-9.11 9.14. Interference between Rack and Pinion and Minimum Number ofTeeth on a Pinion for Involute Rack in order to avoid Interference Solved Problem 9.12 9.15. HelicalGears 9.16. Important Terms for HelicalGears 9.17. SpiralGears 9.18. The Efficiency ofthe SpiralGears Solved Problems 9.13-9.15 Highlights Exercise-9 Introduction Types ofGear Trains 10.2.1. Simple Gear Train 10.2.2. CompoundGear Train 10.2.3. Reverted Gear Train 10.2.4. EpicyclicGear Train 10.3. Velocity Ratio ofGear Trains 10.3.1. Velocity Ratio ofa SimpleGear Train Solved Problems 10.1-10.4 10.3.2. Velocity Ratio ofa CompoundGear Train Solved Problems 10.5-10.6 10.3.3. Velocity Ratio ofRevertedGear Train 10.3.4. Velocity Ratio ofEpicyclicGear Train Solved Problems 10.7-10.12 10.4. Sun and PlanetGear Solved Problems 10.13-10.15 10.5. Torques and Tooth Loads in EpicyclicGear Train Solved Problems 10.16–10.18 10.6. Compound EpicyclicGear Train Solved Problem 10.19 Pages Chapters ✓- 10.7. Epicyclic Gear Train with Bevel Gear Solved Problems 10.20-10.25 Highlights / Exercise-IO Inertia Forces in Reciprocating Parts 1 1. 1. Introduction 1 1.2. D-Alembert’s Principle 1 1’.3. Effect of a Number of Forces Acting on a Rigid Body Solved Problems 1 1 . 1-11.2 1 1.4. Velocity and Acceleration of the Piston 11.4. 1. Analytical method 11.4.2. Angular velocity and angular acceleration ofconnecting rod Solved Problems 1 1.3-1 1.7 11.4.3. Graphical method for velocity and acceleration of reciprocating parts Solved Problems 1 1.8-11 . 10 11 .5. Torque Exerted on the Crank-shaft when Friction and Inertia of Moving Parts are Neglected Solved Problem 1 1. 1 1 1 1.6. Forces on the Reciprocating Parts of an Engine Considering Friction and Inertia ofMoving Parts but Neglecting Weight ofthe Connecting Rod 1 1.6.1 . Piston effort 1 1.6.2. Force acting along the connecting rod 1 1.6.3. Thurst on the sides ofcylinder walls 1 1.6.4. Cank effort 1 1.6.5. Thurst on crank-shaft bearing 1 1.7. Torc;,ue on the Crank-shaft or Turning Moment on Crank-Shaft Solved Problems 11. 12-11.19 1 1.8. Dynamically Equivalent System Solved Problems 11.20-11.22 1 1.9. Magnitude of Correction Couple Applied to Two Mass System which is Dynamically Equivalent to Rigid Body Solved Problem 11.23 1 1. 10. Torque Exerted on the Crank-shaft, Considering the Weight of the Connectin.g Rod Solved Problems 1 1.24-1 1.28 Highlights Exercise–1 1 1 9 �ing Moment Diagrams ¼;.u Introduction 12.2. Turning Moment Diagrams for Different Types of Engines 12.3. Fluctuation ofEnergy and Fluctuation ofSpeed ofCrank-shaft 12.4. Co-efficient of Fluctuation of Energy (Ke) 12.5. Co-efficient of Fluctuation ofSpeed (K5) 12.6. Flywheels Solved Problems 12. 1-12.12 Pages Chapters 12.7. Flywheel’s Rim Dimensions Solved Problems 12.13-12.14 12.8. Operation of a Flywheel in a Punching Press Solved Problems 12.15-12.19 Highlights _ / Exercise-12
    �-a�ancing ofRotatingMasses
    13.1. Introduction
    13.2. Balancing of Rotating Masses
    13.2.1. Balancing ofa Single Rotating Mass
    Solved Problem 13.1
    13.2.2. Balancing ofSeveral Masses Rotating in the same plane
    Solved Problem 13.2
    13.2.3. Balancing ofSeveral Masses Rotating in different planes
    Solved Problems 13.3-13.9
    Highlights
    / Exercise-13
    �alancing ofReciprocating Masses
    14.1. Introduction
    14.2. Balancing ofReciprocating Engine
    14.3. Partial Balancing of Primary Force
    Solved Problem 14.1
    14.4. Partial Balancing of Locomotives
    14.5. Effect ofPartial Balancing ofLocomotives
    14.5.1. Variation ofTractive Force (or Effort)
    14.5.2. Swaying Couple
    14.5.3. Hammer Blow
    Solved Problems 14.2-14.5
    14.6. Coupled Locomotives
    Solved Problem 14.6
    14.7. Primary Balance ofMulti-cylinder In-line Engines
    14.8. Secondary Balance of Multi-cylinder In-line Engines
    Solved Problems 14.7-14.10
    14.9. Method ofDirect and Reverse Cranks
    Solved Problems 14.11-14.12
    14.10. V-Engines Balancing
    Solved Problem 14.13
    Highlights
    Exercise-14
    Introduction
    15.2. Types ofGovernors
    15.3. Types ofCentrifugal Governors
    15.4. Watt Governor
    Solved Problems 15.1-15.2
    15.5. Porter Governor
    Solved Problems 15.3-15.7
    Pages
    768Chapters
    15.6. ProellGovernor
    Solved Problems 15.8-15.9
    15.7. BartnellGovernor
    Solved Problems 15.10-15.13
    15.8. Wilson-HartnellGovernor
    Solved Problems 15.14-15.15
    15.9. Some Important Definitions
    15.9.1. Sensitiveness
    15.9.2. Stability
    15.9.3. Isochronism
    15.9.4. Hunting
    15.10. Governor Effort and Power
    Solved Problem 15.16
    15.11. Controlling Force
    Solved Problems 15.17-15.18
    15.12. Friction and Insensitiveness
    Solved Problems 15.19-15.21
    Highlights
    Exercise-15
    (xvii )
    fbrations (Longitudinal and Transverse)
    16.1. Introduction
    16.2. Types ofVibration
    16.3. Important Definitions for Vibrating Motion
    16.4. Free Vibrations
    16.5. Methods of Finding the Natural Frequency of Free
    Longitudinal Vibrations
    16.5.1. Equilibrium method
    16.5.2. Energy method
    16.5.3. Rayleigh’s method
    16.6. Method for Natural Frequency of Free Transverse Vibrations
    Solved Problem 16.1
    16.7. Effect ofthe Inertia of Shaft on Longitudinal and Transverse Vibrations
    16.8. Natural Frequency ofTransverse Vibrations ofShafts or Beams
    under Different Types of Loads and End Conditions
    16.8.1. Natural frequency ofa shaft carrying a single concentrated load
    Solved Problems 16.2-16.3
    16.8.2. Natural frequency ofa shaft carrying a uniformly distributed load …
    16.9. Natural Frequency ofTransverse Vibrations ofa System
    of Several Loads attached to the Same Shaft
    16.9.1. Energy method
    16.9.2. Dunkerley’s method
    Solved Problems 16.4-16.5
    16.10. Whirling Speeds or Critical Speeds
    Solved Problems 16.6-16.8
    16.11. Damped Vibrations
    16.11.1. Expression for displecement for over-damped, under-damped
    and critical-damped system
    Solved Problems 16.9-16.11
    Pages
    Chapters
    1 6.12. Logarithmic Decrement
    Solved Problems 16.12-16.16
    1 6.13. Forced-Damped Vibrations
    16.14. Magnification Factor
    Solved Problems 16.17-16.20
    1 6.15. Vibration Isolation and Transmissibility
    Solved Problems 16.21-16.22
    Highlights
    Exercise-16
    �orsional Vibrations
    17.1. Introduction
    17.2. Natural Frequency ofFree Torsional Vibrations
    Solved Problem 17.1
    17.3. Effect ofInertia ofShaft on Torsional Vibrations
    17.4. Free Torsional Vibrations ofa Single Rotor System
    17.5. Free Torsional Vibrations ofa Two Rotor System
  3. 6. Free Torsional Vibrations ofa Three Rotor System
    17.7. Torsionally Equivalent Shaft
    ms
    Solved Problems 17.2-17.6
    Free Torsional Vibrations ofa Geared System
    Solved Problems 17.7-17.9
    Highlights
    Exercise-17
    18.1. Introduction
    18.2. Types ofFollowers
    18.3. Nomenclatures for Cam Profile
    18.4. Motions ofthe Follower
    18.5. Uniform Motion or UniformVelocity ofa Follower
    18.6. Simple Harmonic Motion ofFollower
    18.7. Uniform Acceleration and Uniform Retardation
    18.8. Cycloidal Motion
    18.9. Cam Profile Construction
    Solved Problems 18.1-18.4
    18.10. Cam Profile for Roller Followers
    Solved Problems 18.5-18.10
    18.11. Cams with Specified Contours
    18.12. Circular Arc Cam with Flat-faced Follower
    Solved Problems 18.11-18.12
    18.13. Tangent Cam with Roller-follower
    Solved Problem 18.13
    Highlights
    Exercise-18
  4. Computer-Aided Analysis ofMechanisms
    19.1. Introduction
    19.2. Coupler Curve
    19.3. Coupler Curve for Slider Crank Chain
    Pages
    Chapters
    19.3.1. Computer programme for coupler curve in FORTRAN
    19.3.2. Computer programme for coupler curve for
    reciprocating engine mechanism in C++
    Problem 19.1
    19.4. Coupler Curve for Four Bar Kinematic Chain
    19.4.1. Computer programme for coupler curve in FORTRAN
    19.4.2. Computer programme for coupler curve for four bar
    kinematic chain in C++
    Problem 19.2
    19.5. Computer-Aided Analysis ofMechanism
    19.6. Computer-Aided Analysis ofSlider Crank Mechanism
    19.6.1. Expression for displacement
    19.6.2. Expression for velocity
    19.6.3. Expression for acceleration
    19.7. Computer Programme for a Slider Crank Mechanism in FORTRAN
    19.7.1. Computer programme for a slider crank mechanism in C++
    Problem 19.3
    19.8. Computer Aided Analysis ofFour Bar Kinematic Chain
    19.8.1. Expression for displacement
    19.8.2. Expression for velocity
    19.8.3. Expression for acceleration
    19.9. Computer Programme for a Four Bar Kinematic Chain
    Problem 19.4
    \ ~ /Exercise-19 1
    �thesis of M;echanism
    20.1. Introduction
    20.1.1. Number synthesis
    20.2. Degrees ofFreedom ofa Planar Kinematic Chain (Griibler Criterion)
    20.2.1. Minimum number ofbinary links in a constrained mechanism
    with simple hinges
    20.2.2. Fully constrained motion ofa kinematic chain
    20.3. Dimensional Synthesi3
    20.3.1. Graphical method
    20.3.2. Analytical method
    Problems 20.1-20.2
    20.4. Mechanisms for Position Guidance
    20.5. Summary
    Highlights
    Exercise-20
    �yroscopic Effects and Gyroscope
    21.1. Introduction
    21.2. Spinning and Precession
    21.3. Gyroscopic Couple
    Problems 21.1-21.5
    2:J..4. Effect ofGyroscopic Couple on the Stability ofAutomotive Vehicles
    21.4.1. Stability offour wheelers
    Problems 21.6-21.9
    Pages
    Chapters
    21.4.2. Stability of two wheelers
    Problem 21.10
    21.5. Gyroscopic Effects on Ships and Aeroplanes
    21.5.1. Gyroscopic effects on Ships
    21.5.2. Gyroscopic effects on aeroplanes
    21.6. Gyroscopic Analysis of Grinding Mill
    21.7. Gyroscope
    Problems 21.11-21.13
    Exercise-21
    Objective Type Questions
    Index
    Pages
    1066
    1068
    1069
    1069
    1070
    1070
    1072
    1072
    1077
    … 1079-1126
    … 1127-1131 ·Subject Index
    A _
    Absorption dynamometers, 378
    Acceleration, 33
    Acceleration diagram for a link, 129
  • for a slider crank mechanism, 130
    Ackerman steering gear, 192
    Addendum, 399
    Addendum circle, 399
    Angle of friction, 210
  • repose, 217
    Angular displacement, 35
    Angular momentum, 39
    Angular velocity, 35
    Angular acceleration, 35
    Arc of contact ofa gear, 410
    length of, 409
  • recess of a gear, 409
    B
    Balancing of rotating masses, 658
    Balancing of reciprocating masses, 704
    Band brake, simple, 340
  • and block brake, 357
    Belt drive, 284
  • velocity ratio of, 285
  • transmission dynamometers, 381
    Bennett’s construction, 547
    Bevel gears, 397
    Bevis-Gibson flash light torsion dynamometer, 385
    Binary joint, 8
    Binary link, 9
    Brakes, 331
    Braking of a vehicle, 370
    c
    Cams, 928
    Cam profile construction, 944
    Cam profile for roller followers, 954
    Cams with specified contours, 968
    Centrifugal force, 39
  • governors, 759
  • tension, 305
    Chain drives, 284, 326
    Circular arc cam with a flat-faced follower, 968
  • pitch, 399
    Clearance, 400
    Co-efficient of fluctuation of energy, 611
    friction, 210
  • speed, 612
  • restitution, 56
    Compound belt drive, 292
    Compound gear train, 451
    Compound epicyclic gear train, 497
    Completely constrained motion, 7
    Computer-Aided analysis of Mechanism, 992
    Cone of friction, 211
    Cone clutch, 267
    Conical pivot, 242
    Construction of cam profiles, 944
    Controlling force, 808
    Coriolis acceleration, 143
    Coupled locomotives, 724
    Coupler curve, 992
  • for four bar mechanism, 993
  • for slider crank mechanism 992
    Crank and lever mechanism, 12
    Crank effort, 555
    Creep ofbelt, 289
    Critical damping, 855
    Critical speed, 849
    Cross-belt drive, 291
  • length of, 296
    Cross by indicator, 185
    Cycloidal motion, 941
    Cycloidal teeth, 404
    D _
    D’Alembert’s principle, 523
    Damped vibrations, 858
    Damping factor or ratio, 857
    Davis steering gear, 189
    Dedendum, 399
    Dedendum circle, 399
    Degrees offreedom, 4
  • of a planer kinematic chain, 1003
    Design of spur gears, 434
    Diametral pitch, 399
    Differential equation of simple harmonic
    motion, 67
    Differential band brake, 348
    Differential gear of an automobile, 511
    Dimensions of the flywheel rim, 639
    1 1271 128
    Dimensional synthesis, 1006
  • Analytical method, 1011
  • Graphical method, 1006
    Direct cranks, 741
    Disc clutches, 253
    Displacement, 33
    Displacement, velocity and acceleration diagrams
    when follower moves with uniform velocity, 931
    with simple harmonic motion, 934
    with uniform acceleration and retardation, 937
    with cycloidal motion, 941
    Double block or shoe brake, 340
    crank mechanism, 18
    Hooke’s joint, 205
    lever mechanism, 18
    slider crank chain, 18
    Dry friction, 213
    Dunkerley’s method, 846
    Dynamics, 1
    Dynamometers, 331, 378
    Dynamometer, 378
    absorption type, 378
  • transmission type, 381
    E _
    Effect ofgyroscopic couple
  • on automotive vehicles, 1030
  • on ships and aeroplane, 1054
    Efficiency screw jack, 231
    Efficiency of spiral gears, 436
    Effort of a governor, 804
    Elliptical trammel, 18
    Energy, 43
    Energy Method, 833, 845
    Epicyclic gear train, 452
  • torques in, 485
  • train dynamometer, 381
    Epicyclic gear train with Bevel Gear, 501
    Equivalent dynamical system, 572
    Exact straight line motion mechanisms made up
    of turning pairs, 171
  • consiating of one sliding pain, 176
    F _
    Face of the tooth, 399
    Film friction, 212
    Flank ofthe tooth, 400
    Flash light torsion dynamometer, 386
    Flat belt, 3 16
  • collar, 248
  • pivot, 238
    Fluctuation of energy, 610
  • speed, 610
    Flywheel, 613
  • energy stored in, 613
    THEORY OF MACHINES
    rim dimensions of, 639
    in punching press, 645
    Force, 39
  • acting along a connecting rod, 549
  • on reciprocating parts of an engine, 548
    Forced vibrations, 869
    Forms of teeth, 404
    Four bar chain, 11
    Free vibrations, 830
  • types of, 829
    Frequency, 826
    Free torsional vibrations ofsinglerotorsystem, 897
    oftwo rotor system, 898
  • of three rotor system, 900
  • of geared system, 914
    Friction ofpivot and collar bearing, 239
    Friction circle, 276
    Friction clutches, 255
    Friction wheels, 394
    G
    Gears, 394
    Gear ratio, 400
    Gear train, 450
    simple, 450
    compound, 450
    Reverted, 451
    Epicylic, 451
    Governors, 758
    Hartnell, 784
    Porter, 763
    Proell, 778
    Watt, 760
    Wilson-Hartnell, 797
    effort and power, 804
    types of, 758
    Grasshopper mechanism, 178
    Greasy friction, 212
    Grubler’s equation, 10
    Grubler criterion, 1003
    Gyroscopic effects and Gyroscope, 1022
    Gyroscopic couple, 1022
    Gyroscopic effects on aeroplanes, 1055
  • on ships, 1054
    Gyroscopic analysis of Grinoling Mill, 1055
    Gyroscope, 1057
    H _
    Hartung governor, 758
    Hammer blow, 711
    Hartnell governor, 784
    Hart’s mechanism, 174
    Helical gears, 396
    Helix angle, 433INDEX
    Herringbone gears, 397
    Higher pair, 3
    Hooke’s joint, 193
    Humpage’s gear, 511
    Hunting ofgovernors, 803
    ! _
    Impulse, 54
    Impulsive force, 54
    Incompletely constrained motion, 7
    Inertia forces in reciprocating parts of an engine,
    523
    Initial tension in the belt, 312
    Instantaneous centre method, 87
  • centre of rotation, 88
    Instantaneous centre, 96
    Instantaneous method, 87
    Insensitiveness of Governor, 816
    Interference in involute gears, 415
    Internal expanding brake, 362
    Inversion of mechanism, 11
    four bar chain, 12
  • of single slider crank chain, 14
  • of double slider crank chain, 18
    Involute teeth, 407
    Isochronous governors, 803
    K _
    Kennedy Theorem, 99
    Kinetic energy, 43
    Kinematics, 1
    Kinematic chain, 5
  • pair, 2
    Klien’s construction, 536
    L _
    Law of conservation of energy, 53
  • momentum, 55 .,,
    Laws of dry friction, 213
    Low of gearing, 402
    Length of cross belt drive, 296
    of open belt drive, 294
  • of arc of contact, 410
  • of path of contact, 409
    Limiting friction, 210
  • angle of friction, 211
    Link, 2
    Linear acceleration, 33
  • displacement, 33
  • velocity, 33
    Location of instantaneous centres, 97
    Logarithmic decrement, 863
    Longitudinal vibrations, 829
  • natural frequency of, 831
    1 129
    Loss of kinetic energy during elastic impact, 60
    Lower pair, 3
    M
    Machine, 2
    Magnification factor, 875
    Mass, 38
  • moment of inertia, 40
    Maximum efficiency of a screw jack, 232
  • fluctuation of energy, 610
  • fluctuation of speed, 610
    Maximum and minimum speeds of the driving
    shaft, 197
    Mechanical advantage, 121
    Mechanism, 2
    Mechanism for position guidance, 1020
    Method of direct and reverse crank, 741
    Minimum no. ofteeth on the pinion in order to avoid
    interference, 422
  • for involute rack, 431
  • on wheel, 424
    Modified Scott-Russel mechanism, 177
    Module, 399
    Motion of follower, 931
    Motion of Rotation, 87
  • Translation, 87
    Multiple disc clutch, 266
    N _
    Natural frequency of free longitudinal vibrations,
    831
  • transverse vibrations, 835
    Nomenclatures for cam profile, 930
  • torsional vibrations, 895
    Number of degrees of freedom for plane mechanisms, 9
    Number synthesis, 1003
    o _
    Oldham’s coupling, 20
    Open belt drive, 285
  • length of, 294
    Oscillating cylinder engine, 16
    Over-damping, 855
    P _
    Pantograph, 170
    Partial balancing of locomotives, 708
    Partial Balancing ofprimary force, 706
    Path of approach, 400
  • contact, 400
  • recess, 400
    Path of contact length of, 409
    Peaucellier mechanism,· 173
    Period of vibration, 8301 1 30
    Periodic time, 830
    Pickering governor, 759
    Pinion, 400
    Pitch diameter, 398
    Pitch point, 398
    Plate clutches, 2153
    Porter governor, 763
    Potential energy, 43
    Power, 42
  • of a governor, 804
  • transmitted by a belt, 303
    Precession and spinning, 1022
    Pressure angle, 400
    Pressure line, 400
    Principle of conservation of energy, 57
  • momentum, 60
    Proell governor, 778
    Profile, 400
    Prony brake dynamometer, 378
    Q
    Quaternary joint, 8
    Quaternary link, 9
    R
    Rack, 400
    Radial engines, balancing of, 741
    Radius of gyration, 40
    Ratio of.angular velocities, 195
  • belt tensions, 301
    Rayleigh’s method, 834
    Relative velocity method, 104
    Restitution, co-efficient of, 56
    Reverse cranks, 741
    Reverted gear train, 451
    Ritte·rha-gs’s construction, 545
    Robert’s mechanism; 180
    Rolling pair, 4
    Rope drive, 284, 318
    · – ratios of driving tensions for, 319
  • brake dynamometer, 379
    Rotary engine, 16
    Rubbing velocity at a pin joint; 110
    s
    Scott Russell’s mechanism, 176
  • modified, 177
    Screw tread friction, 225
    Screw jack, 226
    Screw pair, 4
    Scotch yoke mechanism, 20
    Sensitiveness of governors, 803
    Simple shoe brake, 331
    ·
    harmonic motion, 65, 934
    ._ pendulum, 74
  • gear train, 450
    Simplex indicator, l83
    THEORY OF MACHINES
    Single block or shoe brake, &31
  • disc clutch, 253
    Single slider crank mechanism, 13
    Sliding friction, 212
  • pair, 3
    Slip of belt, 287
    Solid friction, laws of, 212
    Spherical pair, 4
    Spinning and precession, 1022
    Spiral gears, 434
  • centre distance for a pair of, 434
  • · efficiency of, 436
    Spur gear, 396
    Stability of governors, 803
  • offour wheelers, 1031
  • of two wheelers, 1051
    Statics, 1
    Steering gears, 190
    Straight line mechanism, 171
  • con”sisting ofone sliding pair, 176
  • made up ofturning pairs, 171
    Strain energy, 43
    Structure, 6
    Successfully constrained motion, 7
    Sun and planet wheel, 479
    Swaying couple, 710
    Synthesis of mechanism, 1003
    System of gear teeth, 409
    T
    Tangent cam with roller follower, 977
    Tchebichefe’s mechanism, 178
    Ternary joint, 8
    Ternary link, 9
    Thompson indicator, 186
    Three centres-in-line Theorem, 99
    Thrust on the sides of the cylinder walls, 550
  • on crankshaft bearings, 550
    Time period, 830
    Torque, 41
  • on the crank shaft, 548
  • in epicyclic gear trains, 486
    Torsion dynamometer, 384
    Torsional pendulum, 80
  • vibrations, 894
    Torsionally equivalent shaft, 903
    Transmissibility, 882
    Transverse vibrations, 829
    Trifilar suspension, 80
    Truneated conical pivot, 242
    Turning pair, 4
    Tu•ning moment diagram, 605INDEX
    for different types of engines, 605
    Types ofvibrations, 829
    gear train, 450
    followers, 928
    brakes, 331
    u …, Under damping, 855 Universal joint, 193 Unstable governor, 813 v
    Variation oftractive force, 709
    V-belt, 318
  • drive, 318
  • V-Engines, balancing, 748
    Velocity, 33
    Velocity ratio ofgear trains, 453
  • simple gear train, 454
    compound gear train, 459
    Reverted gear train, 462
    Epicyclic gear train, 463
    Velocity of sliding, 404
    Vibration isolation, 882
    Viscous damping, 849
    Viscous friction, 211
    1 1 3 1
    w
    Watt’s straight line mechanism, 176
    Watt governor, 760
    Weight, 38
    Whirling speed, 849
    Whitworth’s quick return motion mechanism, 14
    Wilson Hartnell governor, 797·
    Work, 41

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