Project Management – All in One

Project Management – All in One
اسم المؤلف
Nick Graham; Mark C. Layton, MBA2, CST, PMP, SAFe SPC; David Morrow, CSP, ICP-ACC; Steven J. Ostermiller, CSP, PMP; Stanley E. Portny, PMP; Doug Rose, CSP-SM, PMI-ACP, PMP, SAFe SPC; and Cynthia Snyder Dionisio
التاريخ
1 ديسمبر 2023
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226
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Project Management – All in One
by Nick Graham; Mark C. Layton,
MBA2, CST, PMP, SAFe SPC; David Morrow,
CSP, ICP-ACC; Steven J. Ostermiller, CSP,
PMP; Stanley E. Portny, PMP; Doug Rose,
CSP-SM, PMI-ACP, PMP, SAFe SPC;
and Cynthia Snyder Dionisio
Contents at a Glance
Introduction 1
Book 1: In the Beginning: Project Management Basics 5
CHAPTER 1: Achieving Results with Project Management 7
CHAPTER 2: Involving the Right People 23
CHAPTER 3: Developing Your Game Plan 43
Book 2: Steering the Ship: Planning and Managing a
Project 71
CHAPTER 1: You Want This Project Done When? 73
CHAPTER 2: Starting Your Project Team Off on the Right Foot 111
CHAPTER 3: Monitoring Progress and Maintaining Control 129
CHAPTER 4: Bringing Your Project to Closure 155
Book 3: Helping Out: Using Tools on a Project 167
CHAPTER 1: Considering Checklists and Templates 169
CHAPTER 2: The Key Documents for Managing a Project 179
CHAPTER 3: Working with Microsoft Project 2019 185
CHAPTER 4: Surveying Cool Shortcuts in Project 2019 197
Book 4: A New Method: Agile Project Management 203
CHAPTER 1: Applying the Agile Manifesto and Principles 205
CHAPTER 2: Defining the Product Vision and Product Roadmap 233
CHAPTER 3: Planning Releases and Sprints 253
CHAPTER 4: Working throughout the Day 285
CHAPTER 5: Showcasing Work, Inspecting, and Adapting 309
Book 5: A Popular Agile Approach: Running
a Scrum Project 321
CHAPTER 1: The First Steps of Scrum 323
CHAPTER 2: Planning Your Project 339
CHAPTER 3: The Talent and the Timing 359
CHAPTER 4: Release and Sprint Planning 377
CHAPTER 5: Getting the Most Out of Sprints 399
CHAPTER 6: Inspect and Adapt: How to Correct Your Course 417Book 6: The Next Level: Enterprise Agility 425
CHAPTER 1: Taking It All In: The Big Picture 427
CHAPTER 2: Sizing Up Your Organization 443
CHAPTER 3: Driving Organizational Change 463
CHAPTER 4: Putting It All Together: Taking Steps toward an Agile Enterprise 485
Book 7: Making It Official: PMP Certification 503
CHAPTER 1: Introducing the PMP Exam 505
CHAPTER 2: It’s All about the Process 519
CHAPTER 3: Reviewing the PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct 541
Index 553Table of Contents v
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION 1
About This Book 1
Foolish Assumptions 2
Icons Used in This Book 2
Beyond the Book 3
Where to Go from Here 3
BOOK 1: IN THE BEGINNING: PROJECT
MANAGEMENT BASICS 5
CHAPTER 1: Achieving Results with Project Management 7
Determining What Makes a Project a Project 7
Understanding the three main components that
define a project 8
Recognizing the diversity of projects 10
Describing the four phases of a project life cycle 10
Defining Project Management 12
Starting with the initiating processes 13
Outlining the planning processes 14
Examining the executing processes 15
Surveying the monitoring and controlling processes 16
Ending with the closing processes 17
Knowing the Project Manager’s Role 17
Looking at the project manager’s tasks 18
Staving off excuses for not following a structured
project-management approach 18
Avoiding shortcuts 19
Staying aware of other potential challenges 20
CHAPTER 2: Involving the Right People 23
Understanding Your Project’s Stakeholders 24
Developing a Stakeholder Register 24
Starting your stakeholder register 25
Ensuring your stakeholder register is complete
and up to date 28
Using a stakeholder register template 30
Determining Whether Stakeholders Are Drivers,
Supporters, or Observers 31
Distinguishing the different groups 32
Deciding when to involve your stakeholders 33
Using different methods to involve your stakeholders 36
Making the most of your stakeholders’ involvement 37vi Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Displaying Your Stakeholder Register 38
Confirming Your Stakeholders’ Authority 39
Assessing Your Stakeholders’ Power and Interest 40
CHAPTER 3: Developing Your Game Plan 43
Divide and Conquer: Breaking Your Project into Manageable
Chunks 43
Thinking in detail 44
Identifying necessary project work with a work breakdown
structure 45
Dealing with special situations 53
Creating and Displaying Your Work Breakdown Structure 57
Considering different schemes to create your WBS hierarchy 57
Using one of two approaches to develop your WBS 58
Categorizing your project’s work 60
Labeling your WBS entries 61
Displaying your WBS in different formats 62
Improving the quality of your WBS 66
Using templates 66
Identifying Risks While Detailing Your Work 68
Documenting What You Need to Know about Your
Planned Project Work 70
BOOK 2: STEERING THE SHIP: PLANNING
AND MANAGING A PROJECT 71
CHAPTER 1: You Want This Project Done When? 73
Picture This: Illustrating a Work Plan with a Network Diagram 74
Defining a network diagram’s elements 74
Drawing a network diagram 76
Analyzing a Network Diagram 77
Reading a network diagram 77
Interpreting a network diagram 79
Working with Your Project’s Network Diagram 84
Determining precedence 84
Using a network diagram to analyze a simple example 87
Developing Your Project’s Schedule 92
Taking the first steps 92
Avoiding the pitfall of backing in to your schedule 93
Meeting an established time constraint 94
Applying different strategies to arrive at your destination
in less time 95
Estimating Activity Duration 102
Determining the underlying factors 103
Considering resource characteristics 103Table of Contents vii
Finding sources of supporting information 104
Improving activity duration estimates 104
Displaying Your Project’s Schedule 106
CHAPTER 2: Starting Your Project Team Off on the
Right Foot 111
Finalizing Your Project’s Participants 112
Are you in? Confirming your team members’ participation 112
Assuring that others are on board 114
Filling in the blanks 115
Developing Your Team 116
Reviewing the approved project plan 117
Developing team and individual goals 118
Specifying team-member roles 118
Defining your team’s operating processes 119
Supporting the development of team-member
relationships 120
Resolving conflicts 120
All together now: Helping your team become a
smooth-functioning unit 123
Laying the Groundwork for Controlling Your Project 125
Selecting and preparing your tracking systems 125
Establishing schedules for reports and meetings 126
Setting your project’s baseline 127
Hear Ye, Hear Ye! Announcing Your Project 127
Setting the Stage for Your Post-Project Evaluation 128
CHAPTER 3: Monitoring Progress and Maintaining Control 129
Holding the Reins: Project Control 130
Establishing Project Management Information Systems 131
The clock’s ticking: Monitoring schedule performance 132
All in a day’s work: Monitoring work effort 138
Follow the money: Monitoring expenditures 143
Putting Your Control Process into Action 147
Heading off problems before they occur 147
Formalizing your control process 148
Identifying possible causes of delays and variances 149
Identifying possible corrective actions 150
Getting back on track: Rebaselining 151
Reacting Responsibly When Changes Are Requested 151
Responding to change requests 152
Creeping away from scope creep 153viii Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
CHAPTER 4: Bringing Your Project to Closure 155
Staying the Course to Completion 156
Planning ahead for your project’s closure 156
Updating your initial closure plans when you’re ready
to wind down the project 157
Charging up your team for the sprint to the finish line 158
Handling Administrative Issues 158
Providing a Smooth Transition for Team Members 159
Surveying the Results: The Post-Project Evaluation 160
Preparing for the evaluation throughout the project 161
Setting the stage for the evaluation meeting 162
Conducting the evaluation meeting 163
Following up on the evaluation 165
BOOK 3: HELPING OUT: USING TOOLS ON A PROJECT 167
CHAPTER 1: Considering Checklists and Templates 169
Using Checklists Properly 170
Understanding Checklist Types 171
Trying Templates 172
Reviewing Project Structure 173
Kicking off the project 173
Doing the planning 175
Delivering project products 175
Closing the project 176
Evaluating the project 176
CHAPTER 2: The Key Documents for Managing a Project 179
Kicking Off 180
Project Planning 180
The major planning documents 180
The logs 181
Control checklists 182
Controlling a Project 183
Thinking About What You Need 184
CHAPTER 3: Working with Microsoft Project 2019 185
Connecting Project 2019 to Project Management 186
Defining “project manager” 187
Identifying what a project manager does 187
Introducing Project 2019 188
Getting to Know You 189
Opening Project 2019 189
Navigating Ribbon tabs and the Ribbon 191
Displaying more tools 194
An Updated Feature: Tell Me What You Want to Do 196Table of Contents ix
CHAPTER 4: Surveying Cool Shortcuts in Project 2019 197
Task Information 197
Resource Information 198
Frequently Used Functions 199
Subtasks 200
Quick Selections 200
Fill Down 200
Navigation 200
Hours to Years 201
Timeline Shortcuts 201
Quick Undo and Repeat 202
BOOK 4: A NEW METHOD: AGILE PROJECT
MANAGEMENT 203
CHAPTER 1: Applying the Agile Manifesto and Principles 205
Understanding the Agile Manifesto 205
Outlining the Four Values of the Agile Manifesto 208
Value 1: Individuals and interactions over processes
and tools 209
Value 2: Working software over comprehensive
documentation 210
Value 3: Customer collaboration over contract negotiation 212
Value 4: Responding to change over following a plan 213
Defining the 12 Agile Principles 214
Agile principles of customer satisfaction 216
Agile principles of quality 218
Agile principles of teamwork 220
Agile principles of product development 222
Adding the Platinum Principles 226
Resisting formality 226
Thinking and acting as a team 227
Visualizing rather than writing 228
Seeing Changes as a Result of Agile Values 229
Taking the Agile Litmus Test 230
CHAPTER 2: Defining the Product Vision and Product
Roadmap 233
Agile Planning 234
Progressive elaboration 236
Inspect and adapt 237
Defining the Product Vision 237
Step 1: Developing the product objective 239
Step 2: Creating a draft vision statement 239
Step 3: Validating and revising the vision statement 241
Step 4: Finalizing the vision statement 242x Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Creating a Product Roadmap 243
Step 1: Identifying product stakeholders 244
Step 2: Establishing product requirements 245
Step 3: Arranging product features 245
Step 4: Estimating efforts and ordering requirements 247
Step 5: Determining high-level time frames 250
Saving your work 250
Completing the Product Backlog 251
CHAPTER 3: Planning Releases and Sprints 253
Refining Requirements and Estimates 253
What is a user story? 254
Steps to create a user story 256
Breaking down requirements 260
Estimation poker 262
Affinity estimating 265
Release Planning 267
Preparing for Release 271
Preparing the product for deployment 271
Prepare for operational support 272
Preparing the organization 273
Preparing the marketplace 274
Sprint Planning 275
The sprint backlog 276
The sprint planning meeting 277
CHAPTER 4: Working throughout the Day 285
Planning Your Day: The Daily Scrum 285
Covering important topics 286
Ensuring an effective meeting 287
Tracking Progress 289
The sprint backlog 289
The task board 292
Understanding Agile Roles in the Sprint 294
Keys for daily product owner success 295
Keys for daily development team member success 296
Keys for daily scrum master success 297
Keys for daily stakeholder success 298
Keys for daily agile mentor success 298
Creating Shippable Functionality 299
Elaborating 300
Developing 300
Verifying 301
Identifying roadblocks 304Table of Contents xi
Implementing Information Radiators 305
Wrapping Up at the End of the Day 307
CHAPTER 5: Showcasing Work, Inspecting, and Adapting 309
The Sprint Review 309
Preparing to demonstrate 310
The sprint review meeting 311
Collecting feedback in the sprint review meeting 314
The Sprint Retrospective 315
Planning for retrospectives 317
The retrospective meeting 317
Inspecting and adapting 319
BOOK 5: A POPULAR AGILE APPROACH: RUNNING
A SCRUM PROJECT 321
CHAPTER 1: The First Steps of Scrum 323
Getting Your Scrum On 323
Show me the money 324
I want it now 325
I’m not sure what I want 326
Is that bug a problem? 327
Your company’s culture 327
The Power in the Product Owner 327
Why Product Owners Love Scrum 329
The Company Goal and Strategy: Stage 1 331
Structuring your vision 332
Finding the crosshair 333
The Scrum Master 333
Scrum master traits 334
Scrum master as servant leader 335
Why scrum masters love scrum 335
Common Roles Outside Scrum 336
Stakeholders 336
Scrum mentors 337
CHAPTER 2: Planning Your Project 339
The Product Roadmap: Stage 2 339
Take the long view 340
Use simple tools 341
Create your product roadmap 342
Set your time frame 343
Breaking Down Requirements 345
Prioritization of requirements 345
Levels of decomposition 346
Seven steps of requirement building 346xii Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Your Product Backlog 347
The dynamic to-do list 349
Product backlog refinement 349
Other possible backlog items 353
Product Backlog Common Practices 354
User stories 354
Further refinement 357
CHAPTER 3: The Talent and the Timing 359
The Development Team 360
The uniqueness of scrum development teams 360
Dedicated teams and cross-functionality 361
Self-organizing and self-managing 362
Co-locating or the nearest thing 364
Getting the Edge on Backlog Estimation 365
Your Definition of Done 365
Common Practices for Estimating 367
Fibonacci numbers and story points 368
Velocity 374
CHAPTER 4: Release and Sprint Planning 377
Release Plan Basics: Stage 3 378
Prioritize, prioritize, prioritize 380
Release goals 382
Release sprints 383
Release plan in practice 384
Sprinting to Your Goals 386
Defining sprints 386
Planning sprint length 387
Following the sprint life cycle 388
Planning Your Sprints: Stage 4 389
Sprint goals 389
Phase I 390
Phase II 391
Your Sprint Backlog 392
The burndown chart benefit 392
Setting backlog capacity 394
Working the sprint backlog 395
Prioritizing sprints 397
CHAPTER 5: Getting the Most Out of Sprints 399
The Daily Scrum: Stage 5 400
Defining the daily scrum 400
Scheduling a daily scrum 402Table of Contents xiii
Conducting a daily scrum 402
Making daily scrums more effective 403
The Team Task Board 404
Swarming 406
Dealing with rejection 407
Handling unfinished requirements 408
The Sprint Review: Stage 6 409
The sprint review process 410
Stakeholder feedback 411
Product increments 412
The Sprint Retrospective: Stage 7 412
The sprint retrospective process 413
The Derby and Larsen process 414
Inspection and adaptation 416
CHAPTER 6: Inspect and Adapt: How to Correct
Your Course 417
The Need for Certainty 417
The Feedback Loop 418
Transparency 419
Antipatterns 421
External Forces 421
In-Flight Course Correction 422
Testing in the Feedback Loop 423
A Culture of Innovation 423
BOOK 6: THE NEXT LEVEL: ENTERPRISE AGILITY 425
CHAPTER 1: Taking It All In: The Big Picture 427
Defining Agile and Enterprise Agility 427
Understanding agile product delivery 428
Defining “enterprise agility” 431
Checking out popular enterprise agile frameworks 432
Practicing as much agile as your organization can tolerate 434
Achieving Enterprise Agility in Three Not-So-Easy Steps 435
Step 1: Review the top enterprise agile frameworks 435
Step 2: Identify your organization’s existing culture 436
Step 3: Create a strategy for making big changes 437
CHAPTER 2: Sizing Up Your Organization 443
Committing to Radical Change 444
Understanding What Culture Is and Why It’s So Difficult to
Change 445
Figuring out why culture is so entrenched 445
Avoiding the common mistake of trying to make agile fit
your organization 447xiv Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Identifying Your Organization’s Culture Type 447
Running with the wolf pack in a control culture 450
Rising with your ability in a competence culture 452
Nurturing your interns in a cultivation culture 454
Working it out together in a collaboration culture 456
Laying the Groundwork for a Successful Transformation 458
Appreciating the value of an agile organization 459
Clarifying your vision 460
Planning for your transformation 461
CHAPTER 3: Driving Organizational Change 463
Choosing an Approach: Top-Down or Bottom-Up 464
Driving Change from Top to Bottom with the Kotter Approach 465
Step 1: Create a sense of urgency around a Big Opportunity 466
Step 2: Build and evolve a guiding coalition 467
Step 3: Form a change vision and strategic initiatives 468
Step 4: Enlist a volunteer army 469
Step 5: Enable action by removing barriers 470
Step 6: Generate (and celebrate) short-term wins 471
Step 7: Sustain acceleration 471
Step 8: Institute change 472
Improving your odds of success 472
Driving a Grassroots Change: A Fearless Approach 473
Recruiting a change evangelist 474
Changing without top-down authority 474
Making change a self-fulfilling prophecy 476
Looking for change patterns 476
Recruiting innovators and early adopters 477
Tailoring your message 477
Steering clear of change myths 478
Overcoming Obstacles Related to Your Organization’s Culture 480
Seeing how culture can sink agile 480
Acknowledging the challenge 481
Prioritizing the challenge 482
Gaining insight into motivation 482
CHAPTER 4: Putting It All Together: Taking Steps toward
an Agile Enterprise 485
Step 1: Identifying Your Organization’s Culture 486
Step 2: Listing the Strengths and Challenges with Changing
Your Culture 488
Step 3: Selecting the Best Approach to Organizational Change
Management 491
Step 4: Training Managers on Lean Thinking 491Table of Contents xv
Step 5: Starting a Lean-Agile Center of Excellence (LACE) 493
Step 6: Choosing a High-Level Value Stream 494
Step 7: Assigning a Budget to the Value Stream 496
Step 8: Selecting an Enterprise Agile Framework 497
Step 9: Shifting from Detailed Plans to Epics 499
Step 10: Respecting and Trusting Your People 500
BOOK 7: MAKING IT OFFICIAL: PMP CERTIFICATION 503
CHAPTER 1: Introducing the PMP Exam 505
Going Over the PMP Exam Blueprint 506
Knowledge and skills 506
Code of ethics and professional conduct 506
Exam scoring 507
Digging into the Exam Domains 507
Initiating the project 507
Planning the project 508
Executing the project 509
Monitoring and controlling the project 509
Closing the project 509
Applying for and Scheduling the Exam 510
Surveying the application process 510
Scheduling your exam 512
Taking the Exam 512
Arriving on exam day 513
Looking at types of questions 514
Trying some exam-taking tips 516
Getting your results 516
Preparing for the Exam 516
CHAPTER 2: It’s All about the Process 519
Managing Your Project Is a Process 519
Understanding Project Management Process Groups 521
Before the Project Begins 523
Initiating processes 523
Planning processes 525
Executing processes 529
Monitoring and Controlling processes 531
Closing processes 532
The Ten Knowledge Areas 534
Project Integration Management 534
Project Scope Management 535
Project Schedule Management 535
Project Cost Management 536xvi Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Project Quality Management 536
Project Resource Management 536
Project Communications Management 537
Project Risk Management 537
Project Procurement Management 538
Project Stakeholder Management 538
Mapping the Processes 539
CHAPTER 3: Reviewing the PMI Code of Ethics
and Professional Conduct 541
Beginning with the Basics of the Code 542
Responsibility 543
Responsibility aspirational standards 543
Responsibility mandatory standards 544
Respect 545
Respect aspirational standards 545
Respect mandatory standards 546
Fairness 547
Fairness aspirational standards 547
Fairness mandatory standards 548
Honesty 549
Honesty aspirational standards 549
Honesty mandatory standards 550
Keeping Key Terms in Mind 551
INDEX 553Introduction 1 1
Keeping Key Terms in Mind
Although you may not see the majority of these terms on the exam, you may see
ethnocentrism, conflict of interest, and duty of loyalty on the exam. However, you
need to be familiar with all the terminology in the context of behaving ethically
and in accordance with the Code:
» Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
» Responsibility
» Respect
» Fairness
» Honesty
» Aspirational standards
» Mandatory standards
» Ethnocentrism
» Conflict of interest
» Duty of loyaltyIndex 553
Index
A
Accelerate: Building Strategic Agility for a
Faster-Moving World (Kotter), 470
acceleration, sustaining, 471–472
Accept column, task board, 406, 407
acceptance criteria
product backlog refinement, 350, 352
user stories, 254
accommodation approach to conflict
resolution, 122
accountability, in scrum development teams,
362–363
accuracy
of expenditure data, 145
of schedule performance data, 137
of work-effort data, 141–142, 147
achieved power, 40
action verbs, defining activities with, 50
activities
duration estimate
improving, 104–106
overview, 102–103
resource characteristics, 103–104
supporting information sources, finding, 104
underlying factors, determining, 103
in network diagrams, 74–75
precedence of, determining, 84–87
processes related to, 527
reducing time, strategies for
general discussion, 95–96
new strategy, developing, 100
performing activities at same time,
96–100
subdividing activities, 101–102
schedule performance, monitoring, 132–138
in work-order agreement, 113
activities, in WBS
defining with action verbs, 50
deliverable/activity hierarchy, 52–53
activity attributes, 527
activity checklists, 171
activity list, 106, 527
activity-in-box network diagram, 76
activity-on-arrow network diagram, 77
activity-on-node network diagram, 76
Add Tasks to Timeline dialog box, Microsoft
Project 2019, 201
administrative issues, handling during closure,
158–159
affinity estimating, 265–267, 371–373
after-party, 288
Agile Alliance, 206, 214–215, 428
Agile Coaches, 478
agile frameworks, 430
agile implementation, three levels of, 439–440
agile litmus test, 230–231
Agile Manifesto, 500
agile litmus test, 230–231
Agile Principles
of customer satisfaction, 216–218
list of, 214–215
of product development, 222–226
of quality, 218–220
of teamwork, 220–222
general discussion, 205–208
information radiators, 306
overview, 428–429
Platinum Principles, 226
values of
changes as result of, 229–230
customer collaboration over contract
negotiation, 212–213554 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Agile Manifesto (continued)
individuals and interactions over processes
and tools, 209–210
responding to change over following a plan,
213–214
working software over comprehensive
documentation, 210–212
agile mentor, 242, 298–299
agile practices, 431
Agile Principles
of customer satisfaction, 216–218
information radiators, 306
list of, 214–215
overview, 206, 429–430
of product development, 222–226
of quality, 218–220
of teamwork, 220–222
agile product development. See also daily work
cycle; specific steps; sprints
decomposition of requirements, 253–254,
260–261
general discussion, 222–226, 427–431
just-in-time planning, 234–237
overview, 233–234
product backlog, 251–252
user stories
affinity estimating, 265–267
creating, 246–260
estimation poker, 262–265
general discussion, 254–256
INVEST approach, 262
Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great
(Derby and Larsen), 318, 414–416
analysis paralysis, 421
anchor user story, 263
Annex A1 of PMBOK Guide
knowledge areas
overview, 520–521, 534
Project Communications Management, 537
Project Cost Management, 536
Project Integration Management, 534
Project Procurement Management, 538
Project Quality Management, 536
Project Resource Management, 536–537
Project Risk Management, 537–538
Project Schedule Management, 535
Project Scope Management, 535
Project Stakeholder Management, 538
mapping processes, 539–540
processes
closing, 532–534
definitions related to, 519–521
executing, 529–530
initiating, 523–525
monitoring and controlling, 531–532
planning, 525–529
project management process groups,
521–523
announcing
new projects, 127–128
project closure, 160
antipatterns, 421
application process, PMP exam, 510–512
appreciation for team member contributions, 160
approvals
obtaining before closure, 159
for plans, 15
team member role, 118
approved project plan, reviewing, 117
arrow diagram, 77
arrows, in network diagrams, 76
artifact, 249
ascribed power, 40
aspirational standards, Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct, 542–543
fairness, 547–548
honesty, 549–550
respect, 545–546
responsibility, 543–544
Assign Resources dialog box, Microsoft Project
2019, 199
assignments
additional, 21
new members, 21
overview, 15–16Index 555
assumptions, in WBS, 49
assumptions about organizational culture,
445–446
auditing projects, 170
authority of stakeholders, confirming, 39–40
automated testing, 302
autonomy, 500
availability of resources, 104
average value, 106
avoidance approach to conflict resolution, 122
B
backing in to schedule, avoiding, 93–94
backlog, product, 245
common practices, 354–357
completing, 251–252
information radiators, 306
items from sprint retrospectives, adding, 319
overview, 347–349, 431
possible items, 353–354
prioritizing requirements, 247–250
priority matrix, 382
product roadmap as initial, 339–340
refining, 279–281
affinity estimating, 371–373
estimation poker, 369–370
Fibonacci numbers and story points, 368–375
fist of five, 370–371
general discussion, 349–353
overview, 367–368
velocity, 374–375
release planning, 268
terminology, 342
updating, 259, 349
user stories, 354–357
backlog, sprint
breaking down user stories into tasks for,
281–283
burndown charts, 289–291, 392–393
example of, 278
information radiators, 306
overview, 392
ownership of, 294
planning sprints, 276–277
prioritizing sprints, 397
setting capacity, 394–395
tracking progress, 289–292
updating at end of day, 307
working, 395–396
Backstage view, Microsoft Project 2019, 192
back-to-front method, 86
backward pass, 81–84
barriers, enabling action by removing, 470–471
baseline for project
rebaselining, 151
setting, 127
Big Opportunity, creating sense of urgency
around, 466–467
Blanchard, Ken, 333
bottom-up approach, for WBS, 59–60
bottom-up strategy for enterprise agility
transformation, 438–439, 464–465, 491. See
also Fearless Change
boxes, in network diagrams, 76
brainstorming approach, for WBS, 59–60, 65
break points, work with no obvious, in WBS, 55
bubble-chart WBS format, 65
budget
assigning to value stream, 496–497
developing, 528
expenditures, monitoring, 143–147
procedures for staying within, 147–148
sprint reviews, evaluating at, 313
burndown charts, 289–291
information radiators, 306
scrum projects, 392–393
business agility, 432, 439–441, 492
Business Case, 174, 180
business-related projects, 10
C
calculation questions, PMP exam, 515
capacity of resources, 104
capacity of sprint backlog, setting, 394–395556 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
carrying-out-the-work phase
checklists and templates for, 175–176
drivers, involving in, 34
observers, involving in, 35
overview, 11
shortcuts, avoiding, 20
stakeholder authority, defining, 39–40
supporters, involving in, 35
categories, using in stakeholder register, 25–26
categorizing project work, in WBS, 60–61
CD (continuous deployment), 271, 301
center of excellence (CoE), 467–469
certainty, need for, 417–418
certification, PMP, 187, 505
challenges, awareness of, 11–12, 20–21
change, as project variable, 186
change evangelists, 474, 478, 479
Change Log, 182
change myths, avoiding, 478–480
change patterns, 476
change requests
managing, 151
processes related to, 530, 531
responding to, 152
change sweet spot, 437–438
change vision, forming, 468–469
changes to product backlog, 349
charge codes, 126
charismatic individuals, 454
charm, personal, 479
charts
burndown, 289–291, 306, 392–393
Gantt, 107, 108–109, 134–135
Microsoft Project 2019, 191
PERT, 77
visualization strategies, 228–229
checklists
activity, 171
for carrying-out-the-work phase, 175–176
for closing phase, 157, 176
completion, 171
control, 182
information, 172
for organizing and preparing phase, 175
overview, 169
for post-project evaluation, 176–177
proper use of, 170–171
for starting project phase, 173–174
types of, 171–172
checks, monitoring, 145
chief information officer (CIO), 32
CI (continuous integration), 219, 271, 301
clarity, in product backlog refinement,
350, 352
classical approach, 77
clients, in stakeholder register, 26
closing phase
administrative issues, handling, 158–159
checklists and templates for, 176
closing processes, 12, 17, 532–534
difficulties in, 156
documents for, 183
drivers, involving in, 34
observers, involving in, 35
overview, 11, 155–156
planning for, 156–157
post-project evaluation
conducting meeting, 163–165
following up on, 165
overview, 160
planning for, 161–162
preparing for meeting, 162–163
shortcuts, avoiding, 20
supporters, involving in, 35
team focus, reinforcing, 158
team transition, 159–160
updating initial plans for, 157
closing questions, PMP exam, 509–510
Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct, PMI
basics of, 542–543
fairness standards, 547–549
honesty standards, 549–550
key terms, 551
overview, 506–507, 541–542
respect standards, 545–547
responsibility standards, 543–545Index 557
CoE (center of excellence), 467–469
cognitive consistency theory, 363
collaboration approach to conflict resolution, 122
collaboration culture
blended cultures, 449
enterprise agility transformation in, 456–458
overview, 436
collaborative design, 300
collaborators, in stakeholder register, 26
co-located teams, 364
combined activity and milestone report, 106,
133–134
combined milestone and Gantt chart, 107
commitment
to enterprise agility transformation, 444
process success and, 13
reconfirming, 130, 131
communication. See also feedback
face-to-face, 221, 364
feedback loop, 411, 418–419, 423
formality, resisting, 226–227
process success and, 13
processes related to, 530, 532
project manager, role of, 188
with stakeholders, 37
team operating processes, 119
with teams, 220–222
transparency, 419–420
communications management plan, 181, 528
communities of practice (CoPs), 454
company culture. See organizational culture
competence culture
enterprise agility transformation in, 452–454
Fearless Change approach for, 491
overview, 436
competition approach to conflict resolution, 122
completion checklists, 171
compliance, in control culture, 450
compromise approach to conflict resolution, 122
computer-based tracking systems, 138
conditionally repeating work, in WBS, 54–55
Cone of Uncertainty, 418
confirmation bias, 487, 490
conflict of interest, 548–549
conflict resolution, 120–123
example of, 121–122
minimizing conflict, 120–121
operating processes, 119
consultation resource, 119
contextual menu of command options, Microsoft
Project 2019, 199
contingency plan, 69
continuous deployment (CD), 271, 301
continuous integration (CI), 219, 271, 301
contract for services received, in WBS,
56–57
contract negotiation, agile focus on customer
collaboration over, 208, 212–213
contractors, in stakeholder register, 26
control checklists, 182
control culture
blended cultures, 449
compliance in, 450
decision-making in, 450
effecting change in, 451–452
enterprise agility transformation in,
450–452
example of failed transformation in, 451
overview, 436–437
reliance on big systems, 450–451
controlling processes. See monitoring and
controlling processes
Conway’s Law, 453
CoPs (communities of practice), 454
corrective actions, 130, 150
cost estimates, 528
cost management plan, 181, 527
cost performance baseline, 528
cost report, 145
costs
in Microsoft Project 2019, 188
processes related to, 532
project manager responsibilities, 188
project variables, 186
sprint reviews, evaluating at, 313558 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
crises, planning during, 18–19
critical path method (CPM), 79–84
backward pass, 81–84
forward pass, 80–81
importance of critical path, 79–80
critical paths
defined, 79
importance of, 79–80
reducing length of, 94–100
schedule performance, monitoring, 135
cross-cutting skill, 506
cross-functional teams, 361–362, 428, 462
Crossing the Chasm (Moore), 332
cultivation culture, 437, 454–456
culture, organizational
blended cultures, 449
enterprise agility transformation
benefits of, 459–460
business agility, achieving, 439–441
challenges in, 458–459
change sweet spot, 437–438
in collaboration culture, 456–458
committing to radical change, 444
in competence culture, 452–454
in control culture, 450–452
in cultivation culture, 454–456
cultural inertia, overcoming, 480–483
effect of culture on, 445–447
identifying existing culture, 436–437,
447–449
mapping out plan, 439
overview, 435, 443
planning for, 461–462
reviewing frameworks, 435
shuhari approach, 441
strategies for, 437–441
tolerance for, 434
top-down and bottom-up strategies, 438–439,
464–465
vision statement, creating, 460–461
existing culture, identifying, 486–488
levels of assumptions about, 445–446
scrum conversion and, 327
SWOT diagram of, 488–490
types of, 436–437, 448
culture of innovation, 423–424
current baseline, 142
customer satisfaction, in agile development,
216–218
customer service department, 244
customer testing, 275
customers
agile focus on collaboration with, 208,
212–213
identifying for user stories, 257–259
overview, 187
preparing for product release, 274
in stakeholder register, 26
D
DAD (Disciplined Agile Delivery), 433, 498
daily huddle. See daily scrum
daily scrum
conducting, 402–403
covering important topics, 286–287
defining, 400–402
effectiveness of, 287–289, 403–404
length of, 400–401
overview, 236, 285–286, 400
props for, 287
scheduling, 402
scrum projects, 400–404
standing up during, 403
tardiness, penalizing, 402
daily standup. See daily scrum
daily work cycle. See also daily scrum
agile mentor, responsibilities of, 298–299
development team members, responsibilities of,
296–297
information radiators, 305–306
overview, 285
product owner, responsibilities of,
295–296
scrum master, responsibilities of, 297–298Index 559
shippable functionality
developing, 300–301
elaboration, 300
overview, 299–300
roadblocks, identifying, 304–305
verifying, 301–304
stakeholders, responsibilities of, 298
tracking progress
overview, 289
sprint backlog, 289–292
task board, 292–294
wrapping up at end of day, 307
de Bono, Edward, 424
death march, 224
decision-making
in control culture, 450
questions for decision-makers, 14
team operating processes, 119
decisiveness, of product owner, 330
decomposition
guidelines for, 260–261
overview, 26, 253–254
scrum projects
levels of, 346, 347
overview, 345
prioritization of requirements, 345–346
seven steps of requirement building, 346–347
user stories
affinity estimating, 265–267
creating, 246–260
estimation poker, 262–265
general discussion, 254–256
INVEST approach, 262
dedicated teams, 361–362
definition of “done” (DoD), 306, 365–367, 462
delays, identifying possible causes of, 149–150
deliverable/activity hierarchy, 52–53
deliverables, 530. See also work breakdown
structure
decomposition process, 44–45
defined, 44, 186
deliverable/activity hierarchy, 52–53
naming in WBS, 49
Delivery Stages, documents for, 183
dependencies, 248
deployment of product, preparing for, 271
Derby, Esther, 318, 414–416
Derby and Larsen model, 414–416
development approaches, in WBS, 58–60
development operations (DevOps), 271
development team. See also daily scrum
co-locating, 364
daily responsibilities of members,
296–297
dedicated teams and cross-functionality,
361–362
developing, 300–301
elaboration, 300
estimating and assigning effort values, 247
overview, 360
product owner, role of, 327
product vision statement, reviewing with, 242
self-organizing and self-managing,
362–363
size of, 360
sprint retrospectives, 315–319, 412–416
sprint review, 310–315, 409–412
uniqueness of, 360
verifying, 301–304
development value streams, 495
DevOps (development operations), 271
dictionary, WBS, 70, 527
diffusion of innovations theory, 476–477
direct authority, 21
Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), 433, 498
discretionary dependencies, 86
display formats, WBS, 62–65
displaying schedule, 106–109
distracters, PMP exam, 515
distribution list, 24
diversity, respect aspirational standards about,
545–546
diversity of projects, 10560 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
documents
agile focus on working software over
comprehensive, 207, 210–212
controlling projects, 183
done, definition of, 306, 365–367, 462
identifying useful documentation, 211–212
for Kick Off, 180
level of documentation, deciding on, 184
overview, 179
for project planning, 180–182
DoD (definition of “done”), 306, 365–367, 462
Done column, task board, 406
draft of product vision statement, creating,
239–241
drawing network diagrams, 76–77
Drive (Pink), 500–501
drivers
categorizing stakeholders as, 31–33
confirming participation of, 114–115
deciding when to involve, 33–34
methods for involving, 36–37
Drucker, Peter, 437
dual operating system, 470–471, 472
duration estimate, 527
improving, 104–106
overview, 102–103
resource characteristics, 103–104
supporting information sources, finding, 104
underlying factors, determining, 103
duration of activities, in network diagrams, 74–75
duration of project
displaying schedule, 106–109
duration estimate
improving, 104–106
overview, 102–103
resource characteristics, 103–104
supporting information sources, finding, 104
underlying factors, determining, 103
network diagrams, 87–92
analysis example, 87–92
defining elements in, 74–76
drawing, 76–77
interpreting, 79–84
overview, 73–74
precedence, determining, 84–87
reading, 77–78
overview, 73–74
reducing, strategies for
general discussion, 95–96
new strategy, developing, 100
performing activities at same time, 96–100
subdividing activities, 101–102
surveys, conducting, 52–53
time constraint, meeting, 94–95
duty of loyalty, 549
E
earliest finish date, 79, 80–81
earliest start date, 79, 80–81
early adopters, 476–477
early majority, 476–477
EEF (enterprise environmental factor), 530
effectiveness of daily scrum, 287–289, 403–404
effort, defined, 247
effort estimate, 246–250, 255
80/20 rule (Pareto Principle), 381
elaboration, 300
electronic user story tools, 255
emotional factors, addressing, 478
empirical approach, 417–418
empirical process control, 492
end users, in stakeholder register, 25, 27
enterprise agility
agile versus, 427–431
defining, 431–432
frameworks, 432–433
enterprise agility transformation. See also Fearless
Change; Kotter approach
benefits of, 459–460
business agility, achieving, 439–441
challenges in, 458–459
change sweet spot, 437–438
in collaboration culture, 456–458
committing to radical change, 444
in competence culture, 452–454Index 561
in control culture, 450–452
in cultivation culture, 454–456
cultural inertia, overcoming, 480–483
culture, effect on, 445–447
identifying existing culture, 436–437, 447–449
mapping out plan, 439
overview, 435, 443
planning for, 461–462
reviewing frameworks, 435
shuhari approach, 441
strategies for, 437–441
ten-step approach to
agile framework, selecting, 497–499
change management technique, choosing, 491
epics, shifting from detailed plans to, 499–500
existing culture, identifying, 486–488
overview, 485–486
respecting and trusting people, 500–501
starting LACE, 493–494
SWOT diagram of culture, 488–490
training managers in Lean thinking, 491–493
value stream, assigning budget to, 496–497
value stream, choosing, 494–495
tolerance for, 434
top-down and bottom-up strategies, 438–439,
464–465
vision statement, creating, 460–461
enterprise environmental factor (EEF), 530
environment, as project variable, 186
epics, 260, 342, 499–500
escalation procedures in conflict resolution, 120
estimate, defined, 247
estimating
activity durations, 527
activity resources, 527
costs, 528
efforts, for product roadmap, 246–250
scrum projects
affinity estimating, 371–373
done, definition of, 365–367
estimation poker, 369–370
Fibonacci numbers and story points, 368–375
fist of five, 370–371
getting edge on, 365
overview, 367–368
velocity, 374–375
estimation poker, 262–265, 369–370, 431
ethics complaint standards, 544–545
ethics standards. See Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct, PMI
ethnocentrism, 546
evaluation, project. See post-project evaluation
events, in network diagrams, 75
excuses, responding to, 18–19
executing processes, 12, 15–16, 529–530
executing questions, PMP exam, 509
existing culture, identifying, 436–437
collaboration culture, 456–458
competence culture, 452–454
control culture, 450–452
cultivation culture, 454–456
general discussion, 447–449
in ten-step approach, 486–488
expansion of project work, avoiding, 153
expected value, 106
expenditures, monitoring
general discussion, 143–147
procedures for staying within budget, 147–148
Exploratory and Business Case Development, 180
external dependencies, 86
external forces, 421
external stakeholders, 26
extreme programming (XP), 224, 271, 301, 430
F
face-to-face communication, 221, 364
fairness standards, Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct, 547–549
fast tracking, 95
Fearless Change
change evangelist, recruiting, 474
change myths, avoiding, 478–480
change patterns, 476
diffusion of innovations theory, 476–477562 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Fearless Change (continued)
fear, leveraging, 475
innovators and early adopters, recruiting, 477
overview, 438, 473
rates of change, 476
selecting, 491
self-fulfilling prophecy, creating, 476
tailoring message, 477
top-down change versus, 474–475
Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas
(Rising and Manns), 473, 476, 478
features, 245–246, 260, 342
feedback
fixing problems, 327
in sprint review meeting, 314–315
stakeholder, 411
for team members, 159, 164
throughout projects, 312
feedback loop, 411, 418–419, 423
Fibonacci numbers
affinity estimating, 371–373
estimation poker, 262–265, 369–370
sprint planning, 390
story points and, 368–375
File Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019, 191–192
fill down option, Microsoft Project 2019, 200
filling in empty team roles, 115–116
finalizing product vision statement, 242
financial expenditures, 125
financial tracking system, 146–147
finish date
earliest, 79, 80–81
latest, 79, 81–84
finish-to-finish precedence relationship, 84–85
finish-to-start precedence relationship, 84–85
fist of five, 370–371
float, 79, 135
backward pass, 81–84
free, 83–84
total, 83–84
focus of teams during closing phase,
reinforcing, 158
formality, resisting, 226–227
formalizing control process, 148–149
Format Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019, 194
forming stage, 123
forward pass, 80–81
frameworks
agile, 430
enterprise agility, 432–433, 435, 497–499
free float, 83–84
free slack, 83–84
front-to-back method, 86
fudge factors, 105
functional managers, in stakeholder register, 29
functionality over comprehensive documentation,
210–211
funds
expenditures, monitoring, 143–147
procedures for staying within budget,
147–148
G
Gantt chart, 107, 108–109, 134–135
Gantt Chart view, Microsoft Project 2019,
192–193
generalists, 454
goals
for product, 239
release, 382–383
sprint, 382, 387, 389–390
sprint planning meeting, setting in, 279–281
for teams, developing, 118
graphical view, 63
graphs, 228–229
group meetings with project stakeholders, 36
groups, Microsoft Project 2019, 191
Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge
(PMBOK Guide), 516–517
knowledge areas
overview, 520–521, 534
Project Communications Management, 537
Project Cost Management, 536
Project Integration Management, 534
Project Procurement Management, 538
Project Quality Management, 536Index 563
Project Resource Management, 536–537
Project Risk Management, 537–538
Project Schedule Management, 535
Project Scope Management, 535
Project Stakeholder Management, 538
mapping processes, 539–540
precedence relationships, 84–85
processes
closing, 532–534
definitions related to, 519–521
executing, 529–530
initiating, 523–525
monitoring and controlling, 531–532
planning, 525–529
project management process groups, 521–523
project components, 9
slack time, 83
guiding coalition, building, 467–468
H
help desks, 273
hierarchy diagram, 63
high functioning teams, 123–125
highest-priority value requirements, 345–346
high-level time frames, determining, 250
hiring team members, 115–116
honesty standards, Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct, 549–550
human resource management plan, 181, 528
I
icons, used in book, 2
identification questions, PMP exam, 515
identifiers, in work-order agreement, 113
identity of team, creating, 116–117
immediate predecessor, 85, 86–87
improvements items, in product backlogs, 354
In Progress column, task board, 405–406
indented-outline WBS format, 63–64
index cards, user stories on, 255, 355–356
individuals, agile focus on, 207, 209–210
in-flight course correction, 422–423
informal agreements, 10
informal written correspondence, with
stakeholders, 36
information checklists, 172
information radiators, 305–306
information sources, finding supporting, 104
initiating processes, 12, 13–14, 523–525
initiating questions, PMP exam, 507–508
innovation, fostering, 500
innovative culture, 423–424
innovators, 476–477
inputs, defining, 519–520
inspecting and adapting, 237
antipatterns, 421
culture of innovation, 423–424
external forces, 421
feedback loop, 418–419
in-flight course correction, 422–423
need for certainty, 417–418
overview, 417
sprint retrospective, 416
testing in feedback loop, 423
transparency, 419–420
integration testing, 302
interactions, agile focus on, 207, 209–210
interest of stakeholders, assessing, 40–41
Interface Gantt chart, 108–109
internal stakeholders, 25–26
interpreting network diagrams, 79–84
introducing team members, 15
INVEST approach, 262, 353
involvement of stakeholders
deciding when to involve, 33–36
maximizing, 37
methods for involving, 36–37
in-your-face documentation, 366
iron triangle, 496
iterations
benefits for product development, 224
overview, 216
retrospectives after, 221564 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
J
Johnson, Spencer, 333
just-in-time planning
inspecting and adapting, 237
overview, 233, 234–235
product backlog, 251–252
product roadmap
estimating efforts and ordering requirements,
246–250
high-level time frames, determining, 250
overview, 243–244
product features, arranging, 245–246
product requirements, establishing, 245
product stakeholders, identifying, 244–245
saving work, 250–251
product vision statement
draft of, creating, 239–241
finalizing, 242
overview, 237–238
product objective, developing, 239
validating and revising, 241–242
progressive elaboration of requirements, 236
for releases, 270
Roadmap to Value, 234–236
K
Kanban, 272, 293, 430, 431, 433
Kick Off, 173–174, 180
knowledge areas
mapping processes to, 539–540
overview, 520–521, 534
Project Communications Management, 537
Project Cost Management, 536
Project Integration Management, 534
Project Procurement Management, 538
Project Quality Management, 536
Project Resource Management, 536–537
Project Risk Management, 537–538
Project Schedule Management, 535
Project Scope Management, 535
Project Stakeholder Management, 538
known unknowns, 68
Kotter, John, 466, 470
Kotter approach
acceleration, sustaining, 471–472
change vision and strategic initiatives, forming,
468–469
guiding coalition, building, 467–468
instituting change, 472
odds of success, improving, 472–473
overview, 438
removing barriers, enabling action by, 470–471
selecting, 491
sense of urgency around a Big Opportunity,
creating, 466–467
short-term wins, generating, 471
steps in, 465–466
volunteer army, enlisting, 469–470
L
labelling entries, in WBS, 61–62
labor reports, 142–143
LACE (Lean-Agile Center of Excellence), 467–468,
493–494
lag, 85
laggards, 477
Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS), 433, 498
Larsen, Diana, 318, 414–416
late majority, 477
lateral thinking, 424
latest finish date, 79, 81–84
latest start date, 79, 81–84
law of diminishing returns, 381
lead, 85
leadership
in collaboration culture, 456
in competence culture, 452
in control culture, 450
in cultivation culture, 454
failures in enterprise agility transformation, 458
Kotter approach, 466–467, 471
Lean Product Delivery, 433
lean startup, 430Index 565
Lean thinking, training managers in, 491–493
Lean-Agile Center of Excellence (LACE), 467–468,
493–494
legal contracts, 10
legal department
feedback in product roadmap stage, 245
release planning, 273
legal requirements, precedence of, 85
legality of stakeholder involvement, 37
length of sprints, planning, 387–388
LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum), 433, 498
lessons learned session. See post-project
evaluation
level of documentation, deciding, 184
levels of decomposition, 346, 347
liaisons, 27
life cycle
of projects, 10–12
of sprint, 388–389, 397
litmus test, agile, 230–231
logic, in determination of precedence, 85
logical dependencies, in determination of
precedence, 86
logistics, in release planning, 273
logs, 181–182
long-term projects, WBS for, 55–56
M
made stuff up (MSU), PMP exam, 515
maintenance and support work, 272–273
maintenance items, in product backlogs, 354
managers
choosing, in precedence of activities, 86
motivation for enterprise agility transformation,
482–483
respecting and trusting others, 500–501
training in Lean thinking, 491–493
mandatory dependencies, 85
mandatory standards, Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct
fairness, 548–549
honesty, 550
overview, 542–543
respect, 546–547
responsibility, 544–545
Manns, Mary Lynn, 473, 476, 478
manual tracking systems, 138
mapping processes, 539–540
market
preparing for product release, 274
speed of release to, 325–326
marketing department
feedback in product roadmap stage, 244
release planning, 273, 274
marketing materials, 275
mastery, 501
meetings, establishing schedules for, 126–127
Mehrabian, Albert, 364
Microsoft Project 2019
contextual menu of command options, 199
fill down option, 200
navigating shortcuts, 200
opening new projects in, 189–191
other tools in, 194–196
overview, 185, 188–189
project manager, role of, 187–188
project variables, 186
quick selections, 200
Resource Information dialog box, 198–199
Ribbon and Ribbon tabs, navigating, 191–194
schedule models in, 189
subtasks, 200
Task Information dialog box, 197–198
Tell Me What You Want to Do feature, 196
Timeline shortcuts, 201
timescale units, 201
undo option, 202
milestones
milestone list, 106, 527
in network diagrams, 74–75
schedule performance, monitoring, 132–138
minimal marketable features, 267
minimum viable product (MVP), 378–379, 380–381
mission statement, 468
mob programming, 303566 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
monitoring and controlling processes, 12, 16–17,
183, 531–532
monitoring and controlling questions, PMP
exam, 509
Moore, Geoffrey, 239, 240, 332
most likely estimate ™, 106
motivation
of employees, 500–501
for enterprise agility transformation, 482–483
MSU (made stuff up), PMP exam, 515
MVP (minimum viable product), 378–379, 380–381
myths about change, 478–480
N
naming deliverables, in work breakdown
structure, 49
navigating shortcuts, Microsoft Project 2019, 200
need for certainty, 417–418
needs assessment survey, 49
negotiating in good faith, 546–547
network diagrams, 87–92, 527
analysis example, 87–92
critical path method
backward pass, 81–84
forward pass, 80–81
importance of critical path, 79–80
defining elements in, 74–76
drawing, 76–77
interpreting, 79–84
overview, 73–74
precedence, determining, 84–87
reading, 77–78
New One Minute Manager, The (Blanchard and
Johnson), 333
noncritical path, 79
norming stage, 123–124
O
objectives, defined, 44
observers, 115
categorizing stakeholders as, 31–33
deciding when to involve, 34–36
methods for involving, 36–37
obstacles to enterprise agility transformation,
overcoming, 480–483
Occam’s Razor, 339
offshore teams, sprint meetings with, 389
one-day sprints, 272
one-on-one meetings with stakeholders, 36
operating processes for teams, defining, 119
operational effectiveness, 177
operational support, preparing for, 272–273
operational value streams, 495
optimistic estimate (to), 106
ordering requirements, in product roadmap,
246–250
organization, preparing for product release,
273–274
organizational change. See enterprise agility
transformation
organizational clout, 305
organizational culture
blended cultures, 449
enterprise agility transformation
benefits of, 459–460
business agility, achieving, 439–441
challenges in, 458–459
change sweet spot, 437–438
in collaboration culture, 456–458
committing to radical change, 444
in competence culture, 452–454
in control culture, 450–452
in cultivation culture, 454–456
cultural inertia, overcoming, 480–483
effect of culture on, 445–447
identifying existing culture, 436–437,
447–449
mapping out plan, 439
overview, 435, 443
planning for, 461–462
reviewing frameworks, 435
shuhari approach, 441
strategies for, 437–441
tolerance for, 434
top-down and bottom-up strategies, 438–439,
464–465
vision statement, creating, 460–461Index 567
existing culture, identifying, 486–488
levels of assumptions about, 445–446
scrum conversion and, 327
SWOT diagram of, 488–490
types of, 436–437, 448
Organizational Culture and Leadership (Schein),
445–446
organization-chart WBS format, 63
organizing and preparing phase
checklists and templates for, 175
drivers, involving in, 34
observers, involving in, 35
overview, 11
supporters, involving in, 35
output, defined, 520
outsourcing, 364
outstanding transactions, reconciling, 159
overhead items, in product backlogs, 354
overtime, 395
ownership, in scrum development teams, 362–363
P
pair programming, 227, 302, 362
Pareto Principle (80/20 rule), 381
participation in teams, confirming, 112–115
Pearson Vue website, 512
peer review, 302
pen-and-pencil rule, 379
penetration testing, 302
percent completed, 132–138
performance
assessing, 130
PMIS for
expenditures, monitoring, 143–147
overview, 131–132
schedule performance, monitoring,
132–138
work effort, monitoring, 138–143
of teams, controlling, 125
performing processes, 16, 124
person effort, 130
personal projects, 10
personas, 257–259, 306, 355
personnel resource use, 125
PERT (program evaluation and review
technique), 106
PERT chart, 77
pessimistic estimate (t
p), 106
phases of project life cycle
checklists and templates for, 173–176
overview, 10–11
Pink, Daniel, 500–501
planning poker, 262–265
planning processes
documents for, 180–182
general discussion, 12, 14–15, 525–529
shortcuts, avoiding, 19–20
planning questions, PMP exam, 508
Platinum Principles, 226
PMBOK Guide. See Guide to the Project Management
Body of Knowledge
PMI. See Project Management Institute
PMIS. See project management information
system
PMO (project management office), 488, 491
PMP (Project Management Plan), 180–181, 526
PMP (Project Management Professional)
certification, 187, 505
PMP Certification Handbook, 510
PMP exam. See Project Management
Professional exam
poker, estimation, 262–265, 369–370, 431
post-project evaluation, 17, 128
checklists and templates for, 176–177
conducting meeting, 163–165
documents for, 183
following up on, 165
overview, 160
planning for, 161–162
preparing for meeting, 162–163
power of stakeholders, assessing, 40–41
Power-Interest Grid, 41
PowerPoint presentations, 479
precedence diagramming method, 76
precedence of activities, determining
example of, 88–89
general discussion, 84–87568 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
predecessors
choosing immediate, 86–87
example of, 88–89
factors affecting, 84–86
preparing for project work, 15–16
primary responsibility, 118
prioritizing requirements
in product roadmap, 247–250
release goals and, 382
release planning, 380–381
in scrum, 324–325, 345–346
in sprints, 397
proactivity, 18
procedural requirements, precedence of, 85
process decision framework, 433
process groups, 521–523
process improvement plan, 528
process versus projects, 8
processes
closing, 12, 17, 532–534
definitions related to, 519–521
executing, 12, 15–16, 529–530
initiating, 12, 13–14, 523–525
in knowledge areas
overview, 534
Project Communications Management, 537
Project Cost Management, 536
Project Integration Management, 534
Project Procurement Management, 538
Project Quality Management, 536
Project Resource Management,
536–537
Project Risk Management, 537–538
Project Schedule Management, 535
Project Scope Management, 535
Project Stakeholder Management, 538
mapping, 539–540
monitoring and controlling, 12, 16–17, 183,
531–532
planning
documents for, 180–182
general discussion, 12, 14–15, 525–529
shortcuts, avoiding, 19–20
project management process groups, 521–523
valuing, 209–210
procurements
negotiating in good faith, 546–547
processes related to, 529, 530, 532, 533
procurement management plan, 181, 529
product, defining, 462
product backlog, 245
common practices, 354–357
completing, 251–252
information radiators, 306
items from sprint retrospectives, adding, 319
overview, 347–349, 431
possible items, 353–354
prioritizing requirements, 247–250
priority matrix, 382
product roadmap as initial, 339–340
refining, 279–281
affinity estimating, 371–373
estimation poker, 369–370
Fibonacci numbers and story points, 368–375
fist of five, 370–371
general discussion, 349–353
overview, 367–368
velocity, 374–375
release planning, 268
terminology, 342
updating, 259, 349
user stories, 354–357
product backlog estimates, 252, 365
product canvas, 306
product development, agile. See agile product
development
product features, arranging, 245–246
product increments, 412. See also shippable
functionality
product objective, developing, 239
product owner, 216
benefits of scrum, 329–331
daily responsibilities of, 295–296
daily scrum, 285–289, 401
developing, 300–301
elaboration, 300Index 569
estimating and assigning effort values, 247
help desk reporting, 273
product owner agent role, 330, 364
rejection of requirements, 407–408
release plans, 381
responsibilities of, 327–329
review for shippable functionality, 303–304
sprint retrospective, 315–319, 412–416
sprint review, 310–315, 409–412
verifying shippable functionality, 301–304
vision statement, creating, 331–333
product owner agents, 330, 364
product requirements
for product roadmap, 245
user stories, creating, 259
product roadmap
estimating efforts and ordering requirements,
246–250
estimation poker, 262–265
high-level time frames, determining, 250
information radiators, 306
overview, 234, 243–244
product features, arranging, 245–246
product requirements, establishing, 245
product stakeholders, identifying, 244–245
saving work, 250–251
scrum projects
creating, 342–343
general discussion, 339–341
terminology, 342
time frame, setting, 343–345
tools for, 341
product stakeholders. See stakeholders
product support, 273
product vision statement
draft of, creating, 239–241
for enterprise agility transformation, 460–461
finalizing, 242
generalizations, avoiding in, 241
information radiators, 306
overview, 234, 237–238
product objective, developing, 239
scrum projects, 331–333, 382
validating and revising, 241–242
product-related processes, 521
products, preparing for deployment, 271
professional societies, in stakeholder register, 26
professionalism, 545–546
program evaluation and review technique
(PERT), 106
program versus projects, 8
progress Gantt chart, 134–135
progress reports, 126–127, 136, 137, 183
progressive elaboration of requirements, 236
Project 2019, Microsoft. See Microsoft Project 2019
project audit, 170
Project Brief, 174
project champion, 33, 114–115
Project Charter, 180, 524
Project Communications Management, 537
Project Completion Report, 183
project control
changes, managing, 151
corrective actions, 150
delays and variances, identifying possible causes
of, 149–150
formalizing control process, 148–149
general discussion, 130–131
overview, 129
PMIS
expenditures, monitoring, 143–147
overview, 131–132
schedule performance, monitoring,
132–138
work effort, monitoring, 138–143
problems, preventing with, 147–148
rebaselining, 151
responding to change requests, 152
scope creep, avoiding, 152
Project Cost Management, 536
Project Evaluation Report, 183
project executive sponsor, confirming
participation of, 114–115
project funding requirements, 528
Project Idea, 180570 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Project Integration Management, 534
Project Issue, 183
project log, 128, 182
project management
closing processes, 12, 17, 532–534
defined, 12–13
executing processes, 12, 15–16, 529–530
initiating processes, 12, 13–14, 523–525
monitoring and controlling processes, 12, 16–17,
183, 531–532
planning processes
documents for, 180–182
general discussion, 12, 14–15, 525–529
shortcuts, avoiding, 19–20
project management information system (PMIS)
expenditures, monitoring, 143–147
overview, 131–132
schedule performance, monitoring, 132–138
work effort, monitoring, 138–143
Project Management Institute (PMI). See also Guide
to the Project Management Body of Knowledge;
Project Management Professional exam
Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct
basics of, 542–543
fairness standards, 547–549
honesty standards, 549–550
key terms, 551
overview, 506–507, 541–542
respect standards, 545–547
responsibility standards, 543–545
membership, 511
Project Management Knowledge Areas
overview, 520–521, 534
Project Communications Management, 537
Project Cost Management, 536
Project Integration Management, 534
Project Procurement Management, 538
Project Quality Management, 536
Project Resource Management, 536–537
Project Risk Management, 537–538
Project Schedule Management, 535
Project Scope Management, 535
Project Stakeholder Management, 538
project management office (PMO), 488, 491
Project Management Plan (PMP), 180–181, 526
project management process groups,
521–523
Project Management Professional (PMP)
certification, 187, 505
Project Management Professional (PMP) exam
application process, 510–512
arriving on exam day, 513–514
closing questions, 509–510
exam blueprint, 506–507
exam scoring, 507
executing questions, 509
getting results of, 516
initiating questions, 507–508
knowledge and skills, 506
monitoring and controlling questions, 509
overview, 505
planning questions, 508
PMBOK Guide, familiarity with, 516–517
PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct,
506–507
preparing for, 512–513, 516–517
qualifications for, 510
scheduling, 512
tips for, 516
types of questions, 514–515
project management triangle, 496
project manager
challenges, awareness of, 20–21
excuses, responding to, 18–19
role of, 17–21, 187–188
shortcuts, avoiding, 19–20
in stakeholder register, 25
tasks, 18
Project Memo, 183
project number, 126
project plan. See also work breakdown structure
decomposition process, 44–45
documents for, 180–182
outlining, 14–15
overview, 43–44
reviewing with team, 117Index 571
project planning and tracking system, choosing,
137–138
Project Procurement Management, 538
Project Quality Management, 536
Project Resource Management, 536–537
Project Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019,
193–194
Project Risk Management, 537–538
project schedule, 527
Project Schedule Management, 535
Project Scope Management, 181, 535
project scope statement, 527
project sponsor, 33, 187
Project Stakeholder Management, 538
project stakeholders
authority of, confirming, 39–40
categorizing drivers, supporters, or observers,
31–33
involving in project
deciding when to, 33–36
maximizing involvement, 37
methods for, 36–37
overview, 23–24
participation of, confirming, 112–115
power and interest of, assessing, 40–41
stakeholder register
categories, using, 25–26
completing and updating, 28–30
displaying, 38
overview, 24
potential stakeholders, 26–27
sample, 27–28
starting, 25–28
templates, 30–31
Project Steering Group (PSG), 184
project teams
announcing projects, 127–128
approved project plan, reviewing, 117
baseline, setting, 127
empty roles, filling in, 115–116
focus during closing phase, reinforcing, 158
goals, developing, 118
identity, creating, 116–117
operating processes, defining, 119
overview, 111–112
participation in, confirming, 112–115
performance of, controlling, 125
post-project evaluation, 128
processes related to, 530
relationships among, supporting development
of, 120
resolving conflicts, 120–123
roles in, specifying, 118–119
schedules for, establishing, 126–127
smooth functioning of, 123–125
thinking and acting as a team, 227–228
tracking systems, 125–126
transition after closing projects, 159–160
project variables, Microsoft Project 2019, 186
projects
diversity of, 10
life cycle of, 10–12
main components of, 8–9
process versus, 8
program versus, 8
PSG (Project Steering Group), 184
public, in stakeholder register, 26
pull mechanism, 396
purchase orders, monitoring, 145
purchase requisitions, monitoring, 145
purpose-driven development, 383
Pygmalion, 476
Q
qualifications for PMP exam, 510
qualitative risk analysis, 528
quality
in agile development, 218–220
processes related to, 528, 532
of work breakdown structure, improving, 66
quality checklists, 182, 528
quality management plan, 528
quality metrics, 528
quantitative risk analysis, 528
questions for decision-makers, 14572 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Quick Access toolbar, Microsoft Project 2019, 190,
191, 194–195
quick selections, Microsoft Project 2019, 200
R
radical change, committing to, 444
RAM (responsibility assignment matrix), 119
rates of change, 476
Rational Unified Process (RUP), 450
reading network diagrams, 77–78
rebaselining, 151
reconfirming commitments, 130, 131
recruiting
change evangelist, 474
early adopters, 477
innovators, 477
team members, 115–116
reducing time, strategies for
general discussion, 95–96
new strategy, developing, 100
performing activities at same time, 96–100
subdividing activities, 101–102
Reengineering Alternative, The (Schneider), 448
register, stakeholder. See stakeholder register
regression testing, 302
regulations and legal requirements, mandatory
standards for, 544
regulators, in stakeholder register, 26
rejected requirements, dealing with,
407–408
relationships among team members, supporting
development of, 120
relative estimating, 248, 368
release goals, 268–269, 382–383
release planning, 260
creating plan, 268–270
overview, 235
preparing for release, 271–275
with product roadmap, 244, 343–345
scrum projects
overview, 378–380
prioritizing requirements, 380–381
release goals, 382–383
release plan, steps in, 384–385
release sprints, 383–384
release sprint, 270, 367, 383–384
release train model, 385
Remember icon, 2
Report Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019, 193
reports
combined activity and milestone, 106, 133–134
cost, 145
establishing schedules for, 126–127
labor, 142–143
in Microsoft Project 2019, 189
progress, 126–127, 136, 137, 183
schedule performance, 136, 137
status, 422–423
types of, 183
wrap-up, 165
representational anchor, 372
requesters, in stakeholder register, 25
required recipient of project results, 119
requirements. See also decomposition; product
roadmap
documentation, 527
prioritizing
in product roadmap, 247–250
release goals and, 382
release planning, 380–381
in scrum, 324–325, 345–346
in sprints, 397
processes related to, 527
in product backlogs, 354
progressive elaboration of, 236
rejected, dealing with, 407–408
unfinished, handling, 408–409
requirements management plan, 526
requirements traceability matrix, 527
resolving conflicts, 120–123
resource breakdown structure, 527
Resource Information dialog box, Microsoft
Project 2019, 198–199
resource requirements, 527Index 573
Resource Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019, 193
resources
duration estimate, 103–104
in Microsoft Project 2019, 188
overview, 8–9
processes related to, 527
project manager, role of, 187
project variables, 186
providing, 462
respect standards, Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct, 545–547
respecting people, 500–501
responding to change, agile focus on, 208,
213–214
responding to change requests, 152
responsibility assignment matrix (RAM), 119
responsibility standards, Code of Ethics and
Professional Conduct, 543–545
retrospectives, sprint. See sprint retrospective
return on investment (ROI), 239
review of Business Case, 180
revising product vision statement, 241–242
Ribbon, Microsoft Project 2019, 190,
191–194
Ribbon tabs, Microsoft Project 2019, 190,
191–194
rigged functionality, 313
Rising, Linda, 473, 476, 478
risk
assessing in product roadmap, 248–249
defined, 247
effect on projects, 9
processes related to, 528–529, 532
product backlog refinement, 350, 352
project variables, 186
in WBS, 68–69
Risk Log, 182
Risk Management Plan, 181, 528
Risk Plan, 175
risk register, 528
roadblocks, identifying, 304–305
roadmap, product. See product roadmap
Roadmap to Value
daily scrum
covering important topics, 286–287
effectiveness of, 287–289
overview, 285–286
scrum projects, 400–404
inspecting and adapting, 319–320
overview, 234–236, 315–316
preparing for, 317
product backlog, 251–252
product roadmap
estimating efforts and ordering requirements,
246–250
high-level time frames, determining, 250
overview, 243–244
product features, arranging, 245–246
product requirements, establishing, 245
product stakeholders, identifying,
244–245
saving work, 250–251
product vision statement
draft of, creating, 239–241
finalizing, 242
overview, 237–238
product objective, developing, 239
validating and revising, 241–242
release planning, 267–270
overview, 378–380
prioritizing requirements, 380–381
release goals, 382–383
release plan, steps in, 384–385
release sprints, 383–384
running meeting, 317–319
sprint planning, 388–392
overview, 275–276
sprint backlog, 276–277
sprint planning meeting
breaking down user stories into tasks,
281–283
overview, 277–279
setting goals and choosing user stories,
279–281574 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
Roadmap to Value (continued)
sprint retrospective, 412–416
sprint review
feedback, collecting, 314–315
overview, 309–310
preparing for, 310–311
running meeting, 311–314
scrum projects, 409–412
Rogers, Everett, 476–477
ROI (return on investment), 239
roles in teams, specifying, 118–119
rolling wave planning, 56, 525
RUP (Rational Unified Process), 450
S
sales department, 244, 273
sandwich technique, 414
saving work, for product roadmap,
250–251
Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), 433, 437,
450–451, 498
schedule
backing in, avoiding, 93–94
displaying, 106–109
duration estimate
improving, 104–106
overview, 102–103
resource characteristics, 103–104
supporting information sources, finding, 104
underlying factors, determining, 103
first steps in developing, 92–93
network diagrams, 87–92
analysis example, 87–92
defining elements in, 74–76
drawing, 76–77
interpreting, 79–84
overview, 73–74
precedence, determining, 84–87
reading, 77–78
overview, 8–9, 73–74
processes related to, 527, 532
project manager, role of, 187
reducing time, strategies for
general discussion, 95–96
new strategy, developing, 100
performing activities at same time, 96–100
subdividing activities, 101–102
for reports and meetings, establishing, 126–127
surveys, conducting, 52–53
time constraint, meeting, 94–95
schedule achievement, 125
schedule baseline, 527
schedule management plan, 527
schedule models, Microsoft Project 2019, 189
schedule performance, monitoring, 132–138
accuracy of data, 137
analyzing performance, 133–135
data, choosing, 132–133
data collection, 135–137
tracking system, choosing, 137–138
scheduling
daily scrum, 402
PMP exam, 512
Schein, Edgar, 445–446
schemes for creating work breakdown
structure, 57–58
Schneider, William, 448
scope
defining, 527
overview, 8–9
processes related to, 526, 532
project manager, role of, 187
project variables, 186
scope baseline, 527
scope creep, avoiding, 152
scope management plan, 526
Scope Statement, 174
scrum
antipatterns, 421
culture of innovation, 423–424
external forces, 421
feedback loop, 418–419
in-flight course correction, 422–423
need for certainty, 417–418Index 575
overview, 430
testing in feedback loop, 423
transparency, 419–420
Scrum Guide, 416
scrum master, 283
benefits of scrum, 335–336
daily responsibilities of, 297–298
daily scrum, 285–289, 400–404
overview, 333
product vision statement, reviewing with, 242
relationships, developing, 336
roadblocks, managing, 304–305
role in development, 301
scrum team capacity, increasing, 395
as servant leader, 335
sprint retrospective, 315–319, 412–416
sprint review, 409–412
traits of, 334–335
scrum mentors, 337
scrum projects, 208
backlog estimation, 365
benefits of scrum, 323–327
daily scrum, 400–404
decomposition
levels of, 346, 347
overview, 345
prioritization of requirements, 345–346
seven steps of requirement building, 346–347
development team
co-locating, 364
dedicated teams and cross-functionality,
361–362
overview, 360
self-organizing and self-managing, 362–363
uniqueness of, 360
done, definition of, 365–367
estimate refinement
affinity estimating, 371–373
estimation poker, 369–370
Fibonacci numbers and story points, 368–375
fist of five, 370–371
overview, 367–368
velocity, 374–375
product backlog
common practices, 354–357
overview, 347–349
possible items, 353–354
refinement, 349–353
terminology, 342
updating, 349
user stories, 354–357
product owner role, 327–331
product roadmap
creating, 342–343
general discussion, 339–341
terminology, 342
time frame, setting, 343–345
tools for, 341
release planning
overview, 378–380
prioritizing requirements, 380–381
release goals, 382–383
release plan, steps in, 384–385
release sprints, 383–384
scrum master role, 333–336
scrum mentors, 337
sprint backlog
burndown charts, 392–393
overview, 392
prioritizing sprints, 397
setting capacity, 394–395
working, 395–396
sprint retrospective, 412–416
sprint review, 409–412
sprints
defining, 386
planning, 389–392
planning length of, 387–388
sprint life cycle, 388–389, 397
stakeholder role, 336–337
task board
overview, 404–406
rejected requirements, dealing with, 407–408
swarming, 406–407
unfinished requirements, handling, 408–409
vision statements for, 331–333576 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
scrum teams. See also scrum master
daily responsibilities
agile mentor, 298–299
development team members, 296–297
overview, 294–295
product owner, 295–296
scrum master, 297–298
stakeholders, 298
daily scrum meeting
covering important topics, 286–287
effectiveness of, 287–289
overview, 285–286
external forces, 421
information radiators, 305–306
operational support, 272–273
product backlog refinement, 349–353
shippable functionality
developing, 300–301
elaboration, 300
overview, 299–300
roadblocks, identifying, 304–305
verifying, 301–304
sprint planning meeting
breaking down user stories into tasks,
281–283
overview, 277–279
setting goals and choosing user stories,
279–281
sprint retrospectives
inspecting and adapting, 319–320
overview, 315–316
preparing for, 317
running meeting, 317–319
sprint review
feedback, collecting, 314–315
overview, 309–310
preparing for, 310–311
running meeting, 311–314
tracking progress
overview, 289
sprint backlog, 289–292
task board, 292–294
velocity, 269
wrapping up at end of day, 307
seagull management, 421
secondary responsibility, 118
self-encapsulated teams, 360
self-fulfilling prophecy, creating, 476
self-managing teams, 362–363
self-organizing teams, 362–363, 428
sense of purpose, 501
sense of urgency around a Big Opportunity,
creating, 466–467
servant leader, 335
shadowing, 227, 362
sheets, Microsoft Project 2019, 191
shippable functionality
developing, 300–301
elaboration, 300
overview, 299–300
roadblocks, identifying, 304–305
sprint review, 310–311
verifying, 301–304
shortcuts, avoiding, 19–20
shortcuts, in Microsoft Project 2019
contextual menu of command options, 199
fill down option, 200
navigating shortcuts, 200
quick selections, 200
Resource Information dialog box,
198–199
subtasks, 200
Task Information dialog box, 197–198
Timeline shortcuts, 201
timescale units, 201
undo option, 202
short-term wins, generating, 471
shuhari approach, 441
Simple Lean-Agile Mindset (SLAM), 492
situational questions, PMP exam, 515
situationally informed strategy. See just-in-time
planning
sizes of projects, 10
skeptics, steamrolling over, 479Index 577
slack
free, 83–84
total, 83–84
slack time, 79, 81–84, 135
SLAM (Simple Lean-Agile Mindset), 492
smoke and mirrors, 421
social culture, 324
software. See also Microsoft Project 2019
financial tracking systems, 146–147
schedule performance tracking systems, 138
SOW (statement of work), 174, 529
speed to market, 325–326
sponsor, project, 187
Spotify Engineering Culture, 433, 437, 498
sprint backlog
breaking down user stories into tasks for,
281–283
burndown charts, 289–291, 392–393
example of, 278
information radiators, 306
overview, 392
ownership of, 294
planning sprints, 276–277
prioritizing sprints, 397
setting capacity, 394–395
tracking progress, 289–292
updating at end of day, 307
working, 395–396
sprint goals, 382, 387, 389–390
sprint life cycle, 388–389, 397
sprint planning meeting, 390
breaking down user stories into tasks,
281–283
enterprise agility transformation, 462
overview, 235, 277–279
setting goals and choosing user stories, 279–281
sprint retrospective, 221
Derby and Larsen process, 414–416
inspecting and adapting, 319–320, 416
overview, 236, 315–316, 412–413
preparing for, 317
process, 413–414
ratio of sprint length to, 317
running meeting, 317–319
sandwich technique, 414
scrum projects, 412–416
sprint review
feedback, collecting, 314–315
with offshore teams, 389
overview, 236, 309–310, 409–410
preparing for, 310–311
process, 410–411
product increments, 412
running meeting, 311–314
scrum projects, 409–412
stakeholder feedback, 411
sprints. See also sprint planning meeting
agile mentor, responsibilities of, 298–299
benefits for product development, 224
defined, 378
defining, 386
development team members, responsibilities of,
296–297
inspecting and adapting, 237
length of, planning, 387–388
life cycle of, 388–389, 397
overview, 216
planning
decomposition in, 260–261
overview, 275–276
in scrum projects, 389–392
sprint backlog, 276–277
velocity, 374
product owner, responsibilities of, 295–296
release planning, 269
retrospectives after, 221
scrum master, responsibilities of, 297–298
shippable functionality
developing, 300–301
elaboration, 300
overview, 299–300
roadblocks, identifying, 304–305
verifying, 301–304
stakeholders, responsibilities of, 298578 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
staff assignments, 530
Stage Completion Report, 183
Stage Plan, 181
Stage Progress Report, 183
Stakeholder Log, 182
Stakeholder Management Plan, 181, 529
stakeholder register
categories, using, 25–26
completing and updating, 28–30
displaying, 38
overview, 24, 524
potential stakeholders, 26–27
sample, 27–28
starting, 25–28
templates for, 30–31
stakeholders
authority of, confirming, 39–40
categorizing drivers, supporters, or observers,
31–33
daily responsibilities of, 298
identifying for product roadmap, 244–245
involving in project
deciding when to, 33–36
maximizing involvement, 37
methods for, 36–37
managing engagement, 530
overview, 23–24
participation of, confirming, 112–115
power and interest of, assessing, 40–41
processes related to, 532
product vision statement, reviewing with, 242
project variables, 186
role of, 336–337
sprint review, 409–412
user stories, creating, 256–257
vision statement for enterprise agility
transformation, 460–461
standard approaches to conflict resolution, 120
Standish Group study, 236, 380
stand-up meetings, 431
start date
earliest, 79, 80–81
latest, 79, 81–84
starting project phase
checklists and templates for,
173–174
drivers, involving in, 34
observers, involving in, 35
overview, 11
supporters, involving in, 35
start-to-finish precedence relationship, 85
start-to-start precedence relationship, 85
State of Scrum 2017–2018 report, 208
statement of work (SOW), 174, 529
static testing, 302
status bar, Microsoft Project 2019, 190,
191, 196
status reports, 422–423
steamrolling over skeptics, 479
sticky notes, 341
storming stage, 123
story points, 368–375
strategic initiatives, forming, 468–469
strategic vision and execution, 492
subdividing activities, 101–102
subtasks, Microsoft Project 2019, 200
success patterns, 445
successors, 84
suppliers, in stakeholder register, 26
support channels, 275
support groups, in stakeholder register,
26–27
supporters
categorizing stakeholders as, 31–33
confirming participation of, 114–115
deciding when to involve, 34–35
methods for involving, 36–37
supporting information sources, finding, 104
supporting responsibility, 118
surveys, for WBS, 51–52
sustainability of agile development, 224
swarming, 281, 354, 396, 401, 406–407
swim lanes, 293
SWOT diagram of culture, 488–490
system testing, 302
system-level optimization, 492Index 579
T
tailoring message, 477
talent, 360
tardiness, penalizing, 402
target release date, 268–269
task board
information radiators, 306
overview, 404–406
rejected requirements, dealing with,
407–408
swarming, 406–407
tracking progress, 292–294
unfinished requirements, handling,
408–409
Task Information dialog box, Microsoft Project
2019, 197–198
Task Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019,
192–193
tasks
in network diagrams, 75
sprint planning, 391
in user stories, 342
team members
filling in empty roles, 115–116
focus during closing phase, reinforcing, 158
goals for, developing, 118
participation, confirming, 112–115
relationships among, supporting, 120
resolving conflicts, 120–123
roles, specifying, 118–119
in stakeholder register, 24, 26
starting projects, 15–16
transition after closing projects, 159–160
team performance assessments, 530
Team Progress Report, 183
team working agreement, 306
teams. See development team; project teams;
scrum teams; team members
teamwork, in agile development, 220–222
Technical Stuff icon, 2
technique, defined, 520
Tell Me What You Want to Do feature, Microsoft
Project 2019, 196
templates
for carrying-out-the-work phase, 175–176
for closing phase, 176
Microsoft Project 2019, 188, 189–190
for organizing and preparing phase, 175
overview, 172
for post-project evaluation, 176–177
for product vision statement, 239
stakeholder register, 30–31
for starting project phase, 173–174
WBS, 66–68
testing, 270
automated, 302
customer, 275
done, definition of, 366–367
in feedback loop, 423
themes, 245–246, 260, 342
thrashing, 361
time, as project variable, 186
time constraints, meeting, 94–95
time frame, setting, 343–345
time log, 140
time sheets, 139–140, 141–142
timeboxing, 279, 372
Timeline, Microsoft Project 2019, 190, 191,
195, 201
time-recording systems, 140–141
timescale units, Microsoft Project 2019, 201
Tip icon, 2
titles, in development teams, 362
t
m (most likely estimate), 106
t
o (optimistic estimate), 106
To Do column, task board, 405–406
tools
defined, 520
valuing, 209–210
top-down approach, for WBS, 58–59
top-down strategy for enterprise agility
transformation, 438–439, 464–465, 474–475,

  1. See also Kotter approach
    total float, 83–84
    total slack, 83–84
    t
    p (pessimistic estimate), 106580 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
    tracking progress, 289. See also sprint backlog;
    task board
    tracking system
    financial, 146–147
    schedule performance, 137–138
    for teams, 125–126
    work-effort, 140–141
    training
    in enterprise agility, 447, 478, 481
    managers in Lean thinking, 491–493
    transformation, enterprise agility. See also
    Fearless Change; Kotter approach
    benefits of, 459–460
    business agility, achieving, 439–441
    challenges in, 458–459
    change sweet spot, 437–438
    in collaboration culture, 456–458
    committing to radical change, 444
    in competence culture, 452–454
    in control culture, 450–452
    in cultivation culture, 454–456
    cultural inertia, overcoming, 480–483
    effect of culture on, 445–447
    identifying existing culture, 436–437, 447–449
    mapping out plan, 439
    overview, 435, 443
    planning for, 461–462
    reviewing frameworks, 435
    shuhari approach, 441
    strategies for, 437–441
    ten-step approach to
    agile framework, selecting, 497–499
    change management technique, choosing, 491
    epics, shifting from detailed plans to, 499–500
    existing culture, identifying, 486–488
    LACE, 493–494
    overview, 485–486
    respecting and trusting people, 500–501
    SWOT diagram of culture, 488–490
    training managers in lean thinking, 491–493
    value stream, assigning budget to, 496–497
    value stream, choosing, 494–495
    tolerance for, 434
    top-down and bottom-up strategies, 438–439,
    464–465
    vision statement, creating, 460–461
    transition after closing projects, 159–160
    transparency, 419–420, 547–548
    trust, 500–501
    U
    undo option, Microsoft Project 2019, 202
    unexpected events, 12
    unfinished requirements, handling, 408–409
    unit testing, 302
    unknown unknowns, 68–69
    updating initial closure plans, 157
    upper management, in stakeholder register, 25
    urgency, sense of, 466–467
    user acceptance testing, 302
    user stories
    affinity estimating, 265–267
    completing product backlog, 252
    creating, 246–260
    defined, 342
    estimation poker, 262–265
    general discussion, 254–256
    INVEST approach, 262, 353
    overview, 431
    release planning, 269
    scrum projects, 354–357
    shippable functionality, 300
    in sprint planning meeting
    breaking down user stories into tasks, 281–283
    choosing, 281–283
    three Cs formula for, 255
    user story ID, 254
    users, identifying for user stories, 257–259
    V
    validating product vision statement, 241–242
    value
    assessing in product roadmap, 248–249
    defined, 247
    user story, 255Index 581
    value streams
    assigning budget to, 496–497
    choosing, 494–495
    development, 495
    operational, 495
    values, in Agile Manifesto
    changes as result of, 229–230
    customer collaboration over contract
    negotiation, 212–213
    individuals and interactions over processes and
    tools, 209–210
    responding to change over following a plan,
    213–214
    working software over comprehensive
    documentation, 210–212
    variance, identifying possible causes of, 149–150
    velocity, 269, 374–375
    vendor bills, monitoring, 145
    vendors, in stakeholder register, 26
    verifying shippable functionality, 301–304
    VersionOne survey, 480
    View Ribbon tab, Microsoft Project 2019, 194
    visibility and performance, 362–363
    vision statement
    draft of, creating, 239–241
    for enterprise agility transformation, 460–461
    finalizing, 242
    generalizations, avoiding in, 241
    information radiators, 306
    overview, 234, 237–238
    product objective, developing, 239
    scrum projects, 331–333, 382
    validating and revising, 241–242
    visualization strategies, 228–229
    volunteer army, enlisting, 469–470
    von Moltke, Helmuth, 234
    vulnerability testing, 302
    W
    Wake, Bill, 262, 353
    Warning icon, 2
    WBS. See work breakdown structure
    WBS dictionary, 70, 527
    what’s in it for me (WIIFM), 37
    WIP (work in progress) limits, 396
    WIP (work-in-progress) pull board, 431
    work breakdown structure (WBS)
    activities, defining with action verbs, 50
    assumptions, 49
    brainstorming approach, 59–60
    bubble-chart format, 65
    categorizing project work, 60–61
    charge codes, setting up, 126
    closure activities in, 157
    conditionally repeating work in, 54–55
    contract for services received, 56–57
    creating, 527
    deliverable/activity hierarchy, 52–53
    developing for small and large projects,
    50–51
    development approaches, 58–60
    display formats, 62–65
    finalizing, 126
    general discussion, 45–47
    indented-outline format, 63–64
    key questions, 48–49
    labelling entries, 61–62
    long-term projects, 55–56
    naming deliverables, focusing on results
    when, 49
    organization-chart format, 63
    quality of, improving, 66
    risks, identifying, 68–69
    rolling-wave approach, 56
    schedule performance, monitoring,
    132–138
    schemes for creating, 57–58
    special situations, dealing with, 53–57
    surveys, conducting, 51–52
    templates, 66–68
    top-down approach, 58–59
    WBS dictionary, 70, 527
    work with no obvious break points in, 55
    in work-order agreement, 113582 Project Management All-in-One For Dummies
    work checklist, 182
    work effort
    monitoring, 138–143
    overview, 75, 130
    work in progress (WIP) limits, 396
    work packages, 46, 48, 70, 183
    work performance data, 530
    working hours, 283
    working software, agile focus on, 207, 210–212
    work-in-progress (WIP) pull board, 431
    work-order agreement, 113–114
    wrapping up at end of day, 307
    wrap-up report, 165
    written approvals, 37
    X
    XLR8, 465–466
    XP (extreme programming), 224, 271, 301, 430

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